<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><HTML><FONT  SIZE=2 PTSIZE=10 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 4/6/05 6:09:59 PM Central Daylight Time, Minnow writes:<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">BTW, obDWJ and getting this back where I think it started, word order in<BR>
English and in particular the order in which adjectives ought to happen,<BR>
DWJ points out that it can be very effective as an attention-grabber if<BR>
one deliberately uses adjectives in an unfamiliar order and makes the<BR>
reader go "eh?" occasionally.&nbsp; She says she does it on purpose<BR>
sometimes, but I haven't found any examples on a quick skim.</BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
<BR>
Tolkien wondered as a child (and was still wondering, writing as an adult) why one said "a great green dragon," and not "a green great dragon." Daresay DWJ knows that. In fact it would be interesting to work a green great dragon into a story, except that one might&nbsp; mishear it as a green grate dragon, that is, a green dragon in a grate, when ... Oy! That's almost Calcifer, that is!<BR>
<BR>
Helen Schinske</FONT></HTML>