<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><HTML><BLOCKQUOTE CITE STYLE="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px" TYPE="CITE"><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2">&gt; -- Charmed Life is contemporary, right?<BR>
Surely not - I had it down as Edwardian, with Lives of Christopher Chant Victorian (say the 1880s).<BR>
</BLOCKQUOTE></FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"><BR>
<BR>
But Janet, whose world is parallel, and a part of the same series, is clearly from a contemporary England and comments at some length on the differences in the culture and technology. She didn't *time* travel. All of the worlds in the same series (series A) are the same age, and the dates would be the same. Barring the ones that never adopted the Gregorian calandar, but the worlds are still the same actual age, even if the counting is off. The technological and social development went off on a different track than in our world, but 1980 is still 1980.<BR>
<BR>
I get something of the same sort of reasoning on the Harry Potter lists where the fans assume that because the wizarding world appears technologically backward and "old-fashioned", it has to be socially backward as well, with the whole one-income families and wives firmly kept at home. Completely forgetting that witches are people of power and were probably "liberated" in a de facto sense before wizarding Seclusion was established in 1692, and liberated by statute within a few months after the first time a wizard tried to keep them from doing something they wanted to do purely on the basis of being female, after that.<BR>
<BR>
Alternate technology is still technology, and aesthetics are not social consiousness, however tempting it is to assume that if p=q, then s=t.</FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"></FONT></HTML>