<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><HTML><FONT  SIZE=2 PTSIZE=10 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 12/18/2004 5:52:19 PM Pacific Standard Time, owner-dwj-digest@suberic.net writes:<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 14:27:44 +1100, ROSLYN wrote:<BR>
<BR>
&gt;<BR>
&gt;It's both, really. You're right that coeducation (and 'modern' ideas about <BR>
&gt;education) comes up in _The Silver Chair_ (I'd forgotten that--thanks!) but <BR>
&gt;it's in _The Voyage of the Dawntreader_ that the other stuff comes up. On <BR>
&gt;page one he writes: "They [Eustace Clarence Scrubb's parents] were <BR>
&gt;vegetarians, non-smokers and teetotallers and wore a special kind of <BR>
&gt;underclothes. In their house there was very little furniture and very few <BR>
&gt;clothes on beds and the windows were always open."<BR>
</BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
<BR>
Why is it that Lewis gets all the heat for this kind of thing? Seems to me Nesbit could be just as nasty about sorts of people she didn't like, buildings she thought ugly, etc. I can remember feeling downright guilty for thinking the dark red curtains she despised so ("the color that blood would not make a stain on" in Nurse's furnished lodgings at the beginning of _The Story of the Amulet_) sounded rather handsome. <BR>
<BR>
I am pretty sure that Lewis was drawing on Nesbit anyway. Witness _The New Treasure Seekers_: "Father knows a man called Eustace Sandal. I do not know how to express his inside soul, but I have heard father say he means well. He is a vegetarian and a Primitive Social Something, and an all-wooler, and things like that, and he is really as good as he can stick, only most awfully dull. I believe he eats bread and milk from choice. ... All the walls were white plaster, the furniture was white deal -- what there was of it, which was precious little. There were no carpets -- only white matting. And there was not a single ornament in a single room! There was a clock on the dining-room mantelpiece, but that could not be counted as an ornament .,. When we were clean Miss Sandal gave us tea. As we sat down she said, 'The motto of our little household is "Plain living and high thinking." ' " <BR>
<BR>
Helen Schinske</FONT></HTML>