<HTML><HEAD>
<META charset=US-ASCII http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=US-ASCII">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2900.2523" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff">
<DIV>
<DIV>Does it have to be in books? What about Darth Vader from Star Wars? He turns out to be good. I feel like I know more examples of this and I just have to think some more; so annoying!</DIV>
<DIV>-Jordan</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>In a message dated 12/17/2004 6:52:20 PM Central Standard Time, jstallcup@juno.com writes:</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: blue 2px solid"><FONT face=Arial>Dear dwj-ers,<BR><BR>Can you help me think of characters who are reversals of the common ideal<BR>images of good and evil?&nbsp; I have a student who is interested in writing a<BR>thesis on the Harry Potter books, and he is particularly interested in<BR>how characters in the books who appear to be villainous turn out to be<BR>"good", and vice versa.&nbsp; For example, Snape appears to be the classic<BR>villain until we find out at the end of Book one that he has been working<BR>to protect Harry and even saved his life.&nbsp; Sirius is another example of<BR>this in the Potterworld.&nbsp; My student doesn't think that this kind of a<BR>twist happens very often.&nbsp; I don't agree, but I have to admit that I'm<BR>having trouble coming up with examples.&nbsp; Well, I can think of plenty of<BR>examples of "good cop who turns out to be the bad guy"--that's a staple<BR>of action movies, of course.&nbsp; But I'm having trouble with examples of the<BR>other way around:&nbsp; appears to be bad, is revealed to be good.<BR><BR>Here's what I have thought of so far:<BR><BR>The "ogre" in&nbsp; _The Ogre Downstairs._&nbsp; &nbsp; I'm sure there are more of these<BR>in dwj's work, but I can't think of any at the moment.<BR>Roy, the last cyborg in the movie _Blade Runner_ to die.&nbsp; He saves<BR>Deckard's life at the last minute before he dies.<BR><BR>These two seem to be my best examples... here are a couple that aren't<BR>quite right:<BR><BR>Rochester in Jane Eyre (but that's stretching it, I think--he's not<BR>exactly villainous, just complicated and brooding.)<BR>Mary in The Secret Garden&nbsp; (again, stretching it--she's not pleasant, but<BR>not exactly villainous, and she develops into the person she<BR>becomes--it's not a sudden reversal)<BR><BR>My student is also arguing that Harry is not the classic "hero" but I<BR>think that he's just the classic "underdog" and that there are lots of<BR>characters like him.&nbsp; He points out that Hermione is not the "ideal"<BR>female as traditionally depicted, but I think she's a classic "studious<BR>late-blossomer." <BR><BR>Any thoughts or examples would be extremely helpful and greatly<BR>appreciated!&nbsp; <BR><BR>Jackie</FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV>
<DIV></DIV></BODY></HTML>