<HTML><HEAD>
<META charset=US-ASCII http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=US-ASCII">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2900.2523" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff">
<DIV>
<DIV>Other than the Wicked Witch of the Waste I never saw the other connections. Being&nbsp;an Oz fan too (more of the movie I have to admit) I am pleasantly suprised. It really is "Ozzy" (not&nbsp;talking about the rock/reality tv star of course)! Cool!</DIV>
<DIV>-Jordan</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>In a message dated 12/16/2004 1:34:59 PM Central Standard Time, gbhillel@netvision.net.il writes:</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: blue 2px solid"><FONT face=Arial>Now that I'm translating "Howl's Moving Castle", so soon after translating<BR>"The Wizard of Oz", I'm once more made acutely aware of the little homages<BR>to Oz scattered throughout Howl. The Wicked Witch of the Waste is such an<BR>obvious play on the Wicked Witch of the West, it hardly needs mentioning.<BR>Several other hints and parallels are clear, such as the animated scarecrow,<BR>the dog companion, the journey to see a mysterious wizard, the significance<BR>of colors as geographical markers. But I'm discovering new bits I hadn't<BR>been aware of before. Compare the following two excerpts, descriptions of<BR>Sophie and Dorothy setting out on their respective journeys:<BR><BR>Sophie: ..."'This grey dress is quite suitable, but I shall need my shawl<BR>and some food.' ... She hobbled to collect her shawl, and wrapped it over<BR>her head and shoulders, as old women did. then she shuffled through into the<BR>house, where she collected her purse with a few coins in it and a parcel of<BR>bread and cheese. She let herself out of the house, carefully hiding the key<BR>in the usual place, and hobbled away down the street, surprised at how calm<BR>she still felt."<BR><BR>Dorothy: "Dorothy had only one other dress, but that happened to be clean<BR>and handing on a peg beside her bed. It was gingham, with checks of white<BR>and blue; and although the blue was somewhat faded with many washings, it<BR>was still a pretty frock. The girl washed herself carefully, dressed herself<BR>in the clean gingham, and tied her pink sunbonnet on her head. She took a<BR>little basket and filled it with bread from the cupboard, laying a white<BR>cloth over the top. ... She closed the door, locked it, and put the key<BR>carefully in the pocket of her dress. And so, with Toto trotting along<BR>soberly behind her, she started on her journey."<BR><BR>Note how matter of fact and calm they both are, both diligent about the key,<BR>both with a mind to practicality. Dorothy has a blue-and white dress,<BR>because she was previously described as the only spot of color in her grey<BR>surroundings. Sophie is just the opposite: the only patch of grey in the<BR>multi-colored May Day celebrations of Market Chipping. I've always though<BR>"Howl" to be the Ozziest of DWJ's books, and being a big Oz fan, I find this<BR>very endearing.</FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV>
<DIV></DIV></BODY></HTML>