<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><HTML><FONT  SIZE=2 PTSIZE=10 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 12/14/2004 5:13:45 PM Pacific Standard Time, Robyn writes:<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I was completely traumatised by this policy when I was in grade 6. There <BR>
was a very big, very stupid boy who bullied me, and one day I got stuck on <BR>
a desk with him and was told to help him with his reading. It was horrific.<BR>
</BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
Even without such problems, other kids who know the subject aren't necessarily ideal tutors anyway. There was a girl in my daughter's class last year who as far as I could tell had dyslexia, or some other processing problem. She was bright and imaginative, but couldn't write properly at all, and had terrible troubles with math (just getting the problem written down without an error was difficult for her). I was incensed when I found that my daughter was ending up helping her most days. This kid needs a professional tutor who can disentangle what she's having trouble processing and work with her considerable visual skills, fostering mental math and using pictures and manipulatives and all that. *I* would have trouble meeting her needs as a math tutor. She most certainly does NOT need my daughter's confused, wordy, nine-year-old explanations. (Sophia's pretty good at math, but explaining math in words is very, very far from being her strong point.)<BR>
<BR>
Helen Schinske</FONT></HTML>