<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><HTML><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2">My experience with the Narnia books was a bit off from the usual. I first encountered - completely by accident - The Magician's Nephew in the public Library when I was about 9. Enjoyed it a lot and never could find it again to reread it. This was because I had paid no attention whatsoever to the author's name, and was even vague on the title. I kept checking that general area of the library shelf but never managed to find it again.<BR>
<BR>
Fast-forward to age 11 or 12 at a friend's house and picking up her copy of Lion, Witch and Wardrobe. Something about it struck me as vaguely familiar from the get-go (probably the style) even though I was sure I had never read it before. Borrowed the book. Was completely aware once I got into the story that not only was this the *Easter* story, but I was delighted to find that it was the *same world* as that book I had never been able to find again! By 11 or 12 I was aware that you needed the author's name to find a book in the library and was so pleased to discover that there was a whole series of these books (even though I never found Prince Caspian or Horse and His Boy until I bought my own copies when i was in college).<BR>
<BR>
Now, even though I recognized the Easter story when I saw it, with absolutely no warning and difficulty, and thought that it was pretty cool to be retelling it as a fantasy story, truth to tell, I had *not* recognized Magician's Nephew as a paraphrase of the Genesis story when I had first read that.<BR>
<BR>
I suspect that maybe you have to blunder into Lewis's retold Christian mythology unaware on your first experience of it and experience it as a *story* first in order to really apreciate it. If you can't hack his style of storytelling (which was an anachronism some 30-40 years out of date by the time he was using it) it doesn't matter how much you agree with his theology. If you go into it aware that it is Christian allegory you are always going to be cheated of the thrill of discovering it for yourself, no matter how high your tolerance for didactic storytelling.</FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"></FONT></HTML>