<HTML><HEAD>
<META charset=US-ASCII http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=US-ASCII">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2900.2523" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff">
<DIV>
<DIV>In a message dated 11/21/2004 1:02:19 PM Central Standard Time, minnow@belfry.org.uk writes:</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: blue 2px solid"><FONT face=Arial>I don't think of any of those as fan-fiction if they are published books; I<BR>would say that the difference between "fan" (as "amateur") and<BR>"professional" writing is whether or not it is making money for someone.<BR>The content is of less importance, in that respect, whether it is a rip-off<BR>from someone else's work or a new look at a situation being told from a<BR>different viewpoint being almost beside the point.</FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV>
<DIV>I think they are still technically fan fiction because the people who wrote them are probably fans of the original and the authors are using the universe and characters of another author. Of course, all the books that have&nbsp;Charlie mentioned are so popular and familiar with the general public everywhere (Wizard of Oz, Hamlet, Beowulf) so you can publish fanfiction like books about them and not have it be a copyright infringement and people will buy them and understand them. I dont know if that made any sense but whatever. </DIV>
<DIV>-Jordan</DIV></BODY></HTML>