<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><HTML><FONT  SIZE=2 PTSIZE=10 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 11/17/2004 6:46:09 PM Pacific Standard Time, Kyra Jucovy &lt;klj@sccs.swarthmore.edu&gt; writes:<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Other lines include "the whole city getting stiff in the<BR>
building heat," "I'm sorry, but I had to make love to all the cracks in<BR>
the pavement and the shop doorways and the puddles of rain that reflected<BR>
your face in my eyes," and "The city's out to get me, but I won't sleep<BR>
with her this evening.&nbsp; Though her buildings are impressive and her<BR>
cul-de-sacs amazing, she's had too many lovers. . . ."&nbsp; I don't know if<BR>
this helps you, but it seems relevant.<BR>
<BR>
</BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
<BR>
This reminds me of a passage in _Kitty Foyle_, by Christopher Morley, in which he describes a city (probably Philadelphia) in high summer. I can't remember the exact words, and a paraphrase would be really icky, but it ends with the city flopping down and saying Take Me.<BR>
<BR>
Though I wasn't wild about that particular city-as-woman trope, I think Morley was a really interesting stylist, particularly in _Kitty Foyle_ and _The Man Who Made Friends with Himself_ (though I haven't read either for many years, so it's possible my mature judgment might be different).<BR>
<BR>
Helen Schinske</FONT></HTML>