<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2800.1458" name=GENERATOR>
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT size=2>I wrote:</FONT></DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE 
style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><FONT color=#000000 size=2 
  FAMILY="SANSSERIF">Weirdstone of Brisingamen_. The Garner book had made an 
  enormous impression<BR>on me, and I have no idea whether it itself was 
  influenced by LOR,<BR></DIV>
  <DIV></FONT><FONT color=#000000 size=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF">JOdel 
  replied:<BR><BR>Not impossible, certainly. I'm inclined to think not. Much 
  more inclined to think that Garner was coming from somewhere else. His books 
  -- or at least the early ones -- aren't in the epic mode at all. They hark 
  back a lot more to the 
  Kipling/Masefield/Just-About-Anyone-You'd-Care-to-Mention model of school-aged 
  children saving the world -- or A world -- generally one accessible through 
  folklore. (Although in all honesty, Kipling's Dan and Una are only cast in the 
  role of witnesses to History.)</FONT><FONT color=#000000 size=2 
  FAMILY="SANSSERIF"></FONT> </DIV>
  <DIV><FONT size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
  <DIV><FONT size=2>Good point. Garner is more about children acting within a 
  mythic&nbsp;world than the Tolkienesque myth epic itself. So when I came upon 
  tLotR and it felt like nothing else I'd read, it probably was.</FONT></DIV>
  <DIV><FONT size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
  <DIV><FONT size=2>Ros</FONT></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>