<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><HTML><FONT  SIZE=2 PTSIZE=10 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 8/24/04 12:21:12 PM Central Daylight Time, Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise &lt;jenne@fiedlerfamily.net&gt; writes:<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Personally, I like the Hobbit and find LOTR tedious, though The Hobbit <BR>
holds up better when read out loud-- if I listened to LOTR rather than <BR>
read it, I might like it better. But the whole tenor of the series is <BR>
dark -- shades of dark gray and dark tan.</BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
<BR>
It was reading _The Hobbit_ out loud to my kids that brought out all its faults, for me. I suppose this is heresy, but it just didn't seem like the same book at all.<BR>
<BR>
Oddly enough, it was the movies that brought home to me how dark the story of LOTR really is. I had been reading around the edges of it for a long while, zooming through the horrors of the Uruk-Hai to get to Fangorn, and all that, and lingering over the idyllic bits. I felt quite guilty to think how much I had made it into my own personal comfort read -- like reading _The Diary of Anne Frank_ as cozy domestic comedy (which a large part of it *is*). On the other hand, Tolkien does rather invite you to take that reading, the hobbitish reading, at least part of the time. <BR>
<BR>
Helen Schinske</FONT></HTML>