<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><HTML><FONT  SIZE=2 PTSIZE=10 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 8/23/2004 4:51:23 PM Pacific Standard Time, minnow@belfry.org.uk writes:<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I was seriously put out by a BBC Radio adaptation some years ago, which<BR>
started with scenes of Gollum being tortured in Mordor --&nbsp; thus giving away<BR>
a fairly important plot-point well before it needed to be revealed, and<BR>
adding nothing except a chance for an actor to do some dramatic screaming.<BR>
</BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
<BR>
Oh, I listened to that adaptation last winter (the one with Ian Holm as Frodo, no?). I thought on the whole it was really quite good (though I didn't like the Aragorn much -- the first time I heard him speaking I thought, "phew, Arrogant son of Arrogant"). <BR>
<BR>
Personally I am still firmly in the camp of LOTR being almost completely wonderful. It's hobbits I find rather tiring, if anything -- Tom Bombadil I am very fond of, though I always tip this way and that at his first few embedded rhymes, thinking, "Oh, dear, this is going to be dreadful," and then, as with slightly cold water, I plunge straight in and like it after all. I didn't mind not being in the films at all though, as no one would *ever* have gotten him right, so what's the odds? Better gone than played by Robin Williams, I say.<BR>
<BR>
I don't find that _The Hobbit_ holds up nearly as well (still a great book, just that I now mutter about which bits need some serious editing -- not shortening, but tightening and rearranging), which makes me more sure that I really do like LOTR and it isn't just sentiment.<BR>
<BR>
Helen Schinske</FONT></HTML>