<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><HTML><BLOCKQUOTE CITE STYLE="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px" TYPE="CITE"><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2">Here's what I think.  Elizabeth Moon is one of those writers who is a fantastic storyteller, but only nominally good at the craft of writing.<BR>
</BLOCKQUOTE></FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"><BR>
<BR>
For me the real problem with her fantasy books, particularly Deed of Paksenarrion is that it was all too obviously written on the RPG model. That was a very popular style back when it first came out, but it didn't exactly make for good books. Or for good storytelling. The fact of the matter is that hoever much fun dungeons and dragons may be to play, and however much it may seem that you are role-playing your way through a fantasy story, it *isn't a story*. It is an artificial consrtuction without any of the sort of pacing, or build, or whatever that a story depends on to function satisfactorily.<BR>
<BR>
Deed inpressed me with Moon's ability to weave the elements of an underlying plot through three extended-length books and have them relate to one another. I was very impressed by her use of little details from the first book as elements of the major turning points of the second and third. But, frankly, the action particularly in the second booik was both literally and figuratively all over the map. The books lacked *structure*, and it irritated me. She doesn't pull this with her space opera. <BR>
<BR>
Ands Spped of Dark, which is neither, is a very well-told tale, from a reader's, if not a strictly literary point of view.</FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"></FONT></HTML>