<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><HTML><FONT  SIZE=2 PTSIZE=10 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 2/20/04 11:38:41 AM Central Standard Time, Roger writes:<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I've found it useful to distinguish "Christmas" (Christian festival)<BR>
from "Xmas" (Mammonist festival); is there a similar distinction<BR>
possible for the two varieties of Easter celebration?</BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
<BR>
But X for Christ is a standard Christian abbreviation (the X being the Greek letter chi). I've seen lots of letters by clerical types signed Yours in X, or Yours in Xt, casual use of Xtianity as quicker to write, etc. I think the stores started saying Xmas just because it was handier to fit in displays and headlines, not specifically to be non-religious.<BR>
<BR>
I know some Christians (usually Episcopalians or Catholics) who make a big deal at home about Advent, which is something the stores have never gotten hold of, and which is the proper name for the pre-Christmas season anyway (it is a penetential season by the way, just as Lent is).<BR>
<BR>
My own wish is that the whole non-religious-Christmas hoohah could just get transferred over to New Year's, which is already a nice secular holiday at the right time of the year, and was formerly the gift-giving time in lots of cultures anyway. <BR>
<BR>
I don't know what to do about Easter, but fortunately it's a bit more limited in scope anyway (people don't usually INSIST on giving everyone they know chocolate bunnies), whereas Christmas keeps expanding and expanding.<BR>
<BR>
Helen Schinske</FONT></HTML>