<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><HTML><BLOCKQUOTE CITE STYLE="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px" TYPE="CITE"><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2">Is there a special circle of Dante's Inferno reserved for people who borrow library books more than seventy years old and no longer in print, and render them impossible to read by underlining words, ...<BR>
</BLOCKQUOTE></FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"><BR>
<BR>
Any way to know how long it's been since the vandalism occured? The book may not ave been so old when it happened...<BR>
<BR>
Out here in L.A. -- although it is probably evident elsewhere, too -- I've noticed that any fine arts related book that came out earlier than maybe the middle or late '60s is as likely as not to have *pages missing*. Especially plates that were just plain torn out, cut in half or whatever. There is one book of Holbein's drawings&nbsp;  from the '40s in our fine arts room that is still circulating even though three quarters of the book is simply not there. The pages were neatly sliced out with a razor blade or something. <BR>
<BR>
It took me a few moments to make the connection and realize that these books have been in the library since before libraries had xerox machines. One there was a xerox available, people gradually stopped tearing out the plates. (Now they take the book home and scan them.)</FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"></FONT></HTML>