<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><HTML><FONT  SIZE=2 PTSIZE=10 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 2/3/2004 1:56:54 PM Pacific Standard Time, owner-dwj-digest@suberic.net writes:<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Otter wrote:<BR>
<BR>
&gt;The only thing that routinely turns up in books from Britain that I<BR>
&gt;have to double-think is 'pavement'.&nbsp; I can usually remember to do<BR>
&gt;it, but, as everybody no doubt knows, in the USofA 'pavement' is<BR>
&gt;where the cars are supposed to be, and the 'sidewalk' is where<BR>
&gt;pedestrians are supposed to be.</BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
<BR>
I've never heard anyone in the US use "pavement" at all unless they were being Anglophilic. Maybe it's a local usage? I certainly would never have known that anyone took it to imply being in the street. At most I would have thought it meant any paved area whatsoever rather than being limited to the sidewalk.<BR>
<BR>
On the other hand, I once nearly got killed because I misunderstood "Steady on" to mean "Keep going" rather than "Stop."<BR>
<BR>
Helen Schinske</FONT></HTML>