<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 12/2/03 9:11:48 PM Central Standard Time, Charlie writes:<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Well, I'd missed that too :-) But I had noticed Nesbit's habit of using =<BR>
'it' to refer to a child, when either sex or both might be being =<BR>
referred to (as in sentences of this kind: 'Each of the children was =<BR>
looking forward to its tea.') When I first read Nesbit I thought this =<BR>
was probably be a feature of writing from that period - influenced =<BR>
either by a particularly sexless view of childhood, or by languages like =<BR>
German where 'Kind' is indeed neuter. Now it occurs to me that I don't =<BR>
remember coming across it since in any other writer. Is it a Nesbitism =<BR>
specifically, or was this usage widespread?</BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
<BR>
It's a Nesbitism, but I'd qualify that -- I don't recall any Victorian/Edwardian author but Nesbit saying things like "After everyone had washed its hands for tea," but I *do* remember some Victorian and maybe Edwardian authors saying "it" for things like puppies, kittens, and babies, even when the gender of said small creature was known to the reader.<BR>
<BR>
Since Nesbit was usually writing about a group of both boys and girls, I think she took the sensible view that we have a neuter pronoun in English, why not use it when it's needed? But "it" has such a long history of being used as a withering dehumanizer ("Oh, look. It thinks It can eat lunch with us. Let's dump milk on Its head to teach It a lesson") that many people aren't happy using it that way.<BR>
<BR>
Helen Schinske</FONT></HTML>