<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 11/18/2003 11:17:28 AM Pacific Standard Time, owner-dwj-digest@suberic.net writes:<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">- --- HSchinske@aol.com wrote:<BR>
&gt; By the way, I just recently read a teen novel,<BR>
&gt; 1950's I think, in which a <BR>
&gt; couple of girls remark on the utter swooniness (or<BR>
&gt; words to that effect) of the <BR>
&gt; name Jon-without-an-H. <BR>
<BR>
Do you remember what it was? it sounds like a quote<BR>
I'll have to use sometime.<BR>
<BR>
Jon<BR>
</BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
It's in _Practically Seventeen_, by Rosamond du Jardin, copyright 1943. The heroine, Tobey, says "My first step was to invent a boy named Jon Hayward. I have always loved the name Jon without an 'h' in it, and have never met anyone whose parents were considerate enough to call him that."<BR>
<BR>
Then she tells her best friend, Barbie (yes, really! Barbie!) that she's been invited to the Hop by said Jon Hayward, and it says "Barbie leaned her chin on her palm and stared dreamily into space. 'A man named Jon -- I've always wanted to meet one. Without an 'h,' I mean. Aren't you just thrilled, Tobey?"<BR>
<BR>
No, it wasn't all like that, or I wouldn't have read the whole thing! <BR>
<BR>
Helen Schinske<BR>
</FONT></HTML>