Deborah<BR><BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #ff0000 2px solid">
<P>I'd actually say that it's the last part of Robyn's paragraph (which <BR>Charlie may disagree with, and on which I abstain leaning toward Robyn) <BR>which is vital, here, to wit: <BR><BR>It *is* elitist to feel morally superior in the matter of not attacking <BR>a small and defenceless child, mob-handed, simply because of the <BR>skin-colour of the child, and to find such attack indefensible, *if*, <BR>as Robyn suggests, there is no reflection on methods (or, I would add, <BR>continual self-reflection about the reality of moral superiority). <BR><BR><EM>I quite agree with you about the importance of continual moral self-reflection (speaking as yet another person with a Quaker upbringing...). I'm not sure that 'elitism' is the best word to describe its absence: moral obtuseness perhaps, though elitist attitudes might be one of the results. Anyway, where I took slight issue with Robyn's original post wasn't in denying the importance of that. It's&nbsp;simply that I think that Will anyway, and arguably Merriman too, do indeed reflect on their methods, and at times regret their necessity, but nevertheless find them to&nbsp;</EM>be<EM> necessary. The whole ends-and-means aspect that we discussed a week or two back.</EM></P>
<P>Charlie</P></BLOCKQUOTE>