<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"><BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE CITE STYLE="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px" TYPE="CITE"></FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2">So reassure me, the kitchen isn't another word for the dining-room in America, is it?<BR>
</BLOCKQUOTE></FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"><BR>
</FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"><BR>
Nope. And&nbsp;  American public schools don't have refectories. Much too high-falutin a term for us Amerikans. Most schools have "cafeterias" which are adjacent to the kitchens.<BR>
<BR>
&gt;&gt;</FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2">I read the posted comment "American schools do nearly always have full kitchens." as meaning that there is no shortage of food to be cooked for the students at American schools.&lt;<BR>
<BR>
Well, primary through High Schools traditionally do serve hot lunches, (although a lot of the kids bring a packed lunch from home). In the kind of inner city schools that enforce uniforms, a fair percentage of the kids have some form of welfare chit entitling them to either lunch or a reduced rate for lunch or sometimes even, breakfast. <BR>
<BR>
When I was in elementary school, kids who lived close enough could even go home for lunch. I doubt that is the case now. Most campuses are closed.<BR>
<BR>
Once you hit college or junior college all bets are off. I remember we mostly ate out of the machines in the student union once we were out of High school.</FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"></FONT></HTML>