<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 5/30/03 3:30:30 AM Central Daylight Time, Sally Odgers writes:<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I have a tiny bit of experience with this reining in thing - and it doesn't<BR>
tend to make most people feel good. I enjoy playing Scrabble, but the only<BR>
person with whom I can play a fair-handed game is myself. If playing with<BR>
social players or with my kids or most relatives, I had to rein in so as not<BR>
to beat them by much - if at all. Thus they either complain that I'm not<BR>
trying, or won't play me because I *am* trying.<BR>
<BR>
However, if I play with a *good* habitual player - i.e. my own sister or one<BR>
particular acquaintance- I almost always lose.</BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
<BR>
You sound about my speed! Perhaps we should play email Scrabble :-) I don't play it very often because my husband isn't really up to my speed (I once beat him three games running when I was in the hospital with a temperature of 103 or so), and the two family members who really like the game play it much better than I do. I expect there will be a point when my kids will be pretty good sparring partners for me.<BR>
<BR>
I like playing it with the OED as the reference dictionary, which means one can make up likely-sounding words and they turn out to be in there -- I once won a game due to scoring a lot of points on "quab." <BR>
<BR>
I am sure there must be a way of handicapping the games to make them more exciting between unequal players. Now that I think about it, this would be a good thing to work on.<BR>
<BR>
Helen Schinske</FONT></HTML>