<!doctype html public "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN">
<html><head><style type="text/css"><!--
blockquote, dl, ul, ol, li { padding-top: 0 ; padding-bottom: 0 }
 --></style><title>Re: Re: Mind control in days of
yore</title></head><body>
<blockquote type="cite" cite>Anna:<br>
&gt;<x-tab>&nbsp; </x-tab>I'm not quite sure how old it is, but quite
old is my guess. In<br>
&gt; English we sometimes call &quot;X&quot; a criss cross which is
derived I think from<br>
&gt; Christ-cross. I wouldn't be surprised if the idea of representing
Christ<br>
&gt; with a simple cross dated back to before the word &quot;cross&quot;
entered the<br>
&gt; vocabulary of these shores... It seems like a fairly obvious step
to me...<br>
&gt; But what do I know? And after staying up too late last night it
is going<br>
&gt; to take a Very Long Time before I can face immersing myself in
the tiny<br>
&gt; print of my OED in the hopes of finding out...<br>
</blockquote>
<blockquote type="cite" cite>It just occurred to me that the cross
might also be there to represent the first letter of 'Christ', which
is indeed X (chi?) in Greek. The crossiness of it does seem rather
fortuitous, though (if not crucial), and can't have hurt in gaining
the abbreviation wider circulation.</blockquote>
<div><br></div>
<div>Yeah, it's from chi for<i> Kristos</i>, rather than the cross.
</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>On a similar note, I remember being very confused when I was
taken to a cemetary as a child, by all the (as I thought) dollar signs
on many of the tombstones.&nbsp; I thought it surprising there were so
many millionaires buried there (not to say crass of them to boast
about it). </div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Hallie.</div>
</body>
</html>