<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><BLOCKQUOTE CITE STYLE="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px" TYPE="CITE"><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2">While on Louise Fitzhugh, I remember seeing a film once about two children who hid inside the Metropolitan Museum for the weekend, and for some reason I have it in my head that she was involved. Anybody got info on that?<BR>
</BLOCKQUOTE></FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"><BR>
</FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"><BR>
"From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs Basil E. Frankweiller" (or close) I don't think it is actually by Fitzhugh but the styles are very similar if it is not. The books came out at about the same time, and both were part of the sylabus in my Children's literature class back about '67 or '68. (Since they were both on the list, I suspect that they may not have been by the same author.) I enjoyed it a lot and reas a numberof the authors other books for several years afterward. Most of them held up very well. Better than Fitzhugh's, iirc. (Ah, that's right, </FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2">E. Konigsberg.)</FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"><BR>
<BR>
Another author I discovered through that class was Zylpha Keatly Snyder. The Velvet Room, I think.<BR>
<BR>
It was a really good class on straight childrens' fiction. But a real washout on fantasy. The example on the reading list was a portentious piece of claptrap called Knee-Deep in Thunder. Wrinkle in Time was the teacher's concept of science fiction. *sigh*</FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"></FONT></HTML>