<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=us-ascii">
<TITLE>Message</TITLE>

<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2800.1126" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial size=2>I've read some of 
the Potter messages and I have to say I'm a bit surprised the short shrift we've 
given J.K. Rowling on this list.&nbsp; I'll make a few points first and then 
respond to some specific posts.</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial 
size=2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial size=2>First, I'll come 
clean with the fact that I liked the Harry Potter books a lot.&nbsp; Part of 
that might be that I read them for the first time by reading them aloud to my 
kids.&nbsp; Doing so made some things very clear that I might have missed 
otherwise.&nbsp; Like how vivid the imagery is.&nbsp; It is no surprise to me 
that people watching the movie almost universally exclaim how like their vision 
of the book it is.&nbsp; That doesn't seem very remarkable, but think how 
singularly <STRONG>rare</STRONG> that is.&nbsp; How many book adaptations have 
even a fraction of their fans talking about how close to their vision it 
was?&nbsp; Not even the superb Peter Jackson adaptation of Lord of the Rings has 
managed that.&nbsp; It's a remarkable (but sadly unremarked) evidence of 
Rowling's real strength as a writer.</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial 
size=2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial size=2>Another thing that 
occurred to me is how easy the books are to read.&nbsp; They literally 
flow.&nbsp;&nbsp;And cues about tone and inflection are brilliantly delineated 
in a way that will teach young readers how to interpret inflection in a written 
work (which is a lot less obvious than we adults assume from our faulty memories 
of the process).&nbsp; This was a great help in reading them aloud and I'm sure 
it's a similar help to young readers learning to interpret narrative 
story.</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial 
size=2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial size=2>One thing I think 
specifically&nbsp;is getting short shrift isn't just that we're comparing 
Rowling at the beginning of her career to DWJ after years of experience, but 
also that they are writing to very different&nbsp;audiences.&nbsp; You can 
generally tell the audience for a book by taking the heroes age and subtracting 
two.&nbsp; Rowling is clearly writing for an audience between 8 and 10 years old 
(at least to start).&nbsp; This is a <STRONG>substantially</STRONG> different 
audience from DWJ who tends to write for the 12+ age range.&nbsp; This young 
audience makes it a lot harder to write stories complex enough to engage adults 
and I find it amazing that Rowling has managed it as well as she has.&nbsp; And 
she manages to sneak very complex themes in there as well if you look for 
them.&nbsp; She <STRONG>constantly </STRONG>undermines easy categorizations, for 
example.&nbsp; To do this, she first sets up strong categorizations (Good vs. 
Evil, or school houses).&nbsp; Since kids tend to see things simply, this is 
familiar territory to them and something they embrace right off.&nbsp; Only then 
Rowling introduces gentle remonstrations.&nbsp; Snape is a 
<STRONG>great</STRONG> example of this as he is the prime suspect in 
<STRONG>every</STRONG> book because the lead characters dislike him so much and 
he dislikes 'em right back.&nbsp; Only, he isn't the bad-guy.&nbsp; Ever.&nbsp; 
Which means we can't be comfortable putting people into categories based on 
whether we like them or not.</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial 
size=2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial size=2>And the best thing 
about it is how gently she does all this.&nbsp; Instead of thwacking us upside 
the head with constant moral lessons, she inserts them easily under the 
radar.</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial 
size=2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial size=2>Okay, that said, 
some responses.&nbsp; Before I do, though, I want to make it explicit that I 
don't mean anything against those who have made the comments I'm replying 
to.&nbsp; I'm only occasionally right, so don't take&nbsp;it as any kind of 
attack just because I disagree or want to counter a point you 
made.</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial 
size=2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial size=2>&gt; Behalf Of <A 
href="mailto:johanna@nobrandheroine.net">johanna@nobrandheroine.net</A><BR>&gt; 
Has anyone else been disturbed by the whole house-elf <BR>&gt; thing? Like how 
it's treated like a big joke that Hermione <BR>&gt; wants to get them better 
treatment--like just a nerdy <BR>&gt; Hermione-type thing to do, that no one has 
to take seriously. <BR>&gt; And everyone goes on about how the house elves are 
happy <BR>&gt; being treated the way they are, &amp; such... echoes of American 
<BR>&gt; slavery rhetoric, anyone? I'm hoping Rowling redeems herself <BR>&gt; 
by having people gradually realize that, hm, maybe Hermione <BR>&gt; is on to 
something--instead of it just being a bit of comic relief.</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN class=671364100-01022003>To me, Rowling has 
nothing to redeem herself for.&nbsp; In the course of the text, none other than 
Dumbledore is shown to agree with Hermione.&nbsp; Their methods only 
differ.&nbsp; Dumbledore employs more house-elves than he needs, keeps their 
work-load light, and rewards them in ways others wouldn't even consider.&nbsp; 
And he has <STRONG>always</STRONG> offered them freedom should they desire 
it.&nbsp; So while others ignorantly claim that house-elves work so hard because 
it makes them happy (hello Ron and Harry), it becomes clear to us, the 
readers,&nbsp;that there is at least a touch of cultural conditioning 
involved.</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN 
class=671364100-01022003></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN class=671364100-01022003>So I find Rowling's 
point one of the most important points in the book--you can't be any freer than 
you want to be.&nbsp; The temptation is to go all paternalistic and try to force 
them to be free (hello Hermione)--even though they're clearly unprepared for 
that extreme change.&nbsp; In contrast, Dumbledore does what he's been doing 
with Ron, Hermione and Harry--he gives them a little more freedom than they're 
comfortable with, as much guidance as he can, and his trust.&nbsp; It's an 
interesting commentary on paternalistic coercion&nbsp;vs. trusting guidance--a 
lesson I find very interesting from the perspective of a father with children 
who are, well, less capable than I am, who need guidance, but also trust and a 
recognition of their potential to become worthwhile adults.&nbsp; Instead of 
moving them from one form of subjugation to another (subjugation of slavery to 
the subjugation of handling responsibilities they are in no way equipped to 
handle--and thus being forced to rely on others just as if they were still 
slaves), Rowling truly takes them from subjugation by assisting in their growth 
process--not by dictating lessons, but by providing the resources they need to 
develop judgment and confidence.</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial size=2>&gt; Behalf Of Kyla 
Tornheim<BR>&gt; One thing I didn't understand was--Harry gets *away* from the 
<BR>&gt; Dursleys, and then he goes *back*? Sheesh. They're abusive. <BR>&gt; 
I'm sure *someone* (Dumbledore, McGonagall, this would be you <BR>&gt; guys) 
could have gotten their guardianship negated or <BR>&gt; something. I always 
thought Harry should go live with the <BR>&gt; Weasleys and pay for his room and 
board, which would solve a <BR>&gt; number of problems all 
round.<BR></FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial size=2>Dumbledore 
<STRONG>put</STRONG> Harry with the Dursleys.&nbsp; And reinforced that at the 
end of book four by sending him back.&nbsp; Obviously, there is something going 
on there that we haven't explored yet.&nbsp; Since book four also introduced 
some interesting statements about blood and blood ties, I'm relatively certain 
that something important is brewing on that front.&nbsp; I don't think it has to 
do with "family" as much as it has to do with relation--similar, yes, but only 
in an unexamined way.&nbsp; I wouldn't be at all surprised if book five doesn't 
explore this deeper.</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial 
size=2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN 
class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial size=2>&gt; Behalf Of Kyla 
Tornheim</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV>&gt; There was some article somewhere, or perhaps it was on <BR>&gt; 
another e-mail list I'm on, in which the non-positive aspect <BR>&gt; of 
Gryffindor was discussed, and I found it really <BR>&gt; interesting. 
Gryffindors tend to ignore rules right and left. <BR>&gt; Sure, it's mostly "for 
the greater good," but even Hermione <BR>&gt; is all "oh, we're not allowed to 
do magic on our own, <BR>&gt; particularly really difficult and dangerous 
spells? eh, <BR>&gt; whatever. We're doing *important<BR>&gt; stuff* 
here!"</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial size=2>This is a deliberate 
part of the books that I find a strength and not a weakness.&nbsp; Gryffindor 
isn't the house of good-guys.&nbsp; It's the house of courage and personal 
honor.&nbsp; Traits that are hard, but not impossible, to subvert to evil (as I 
think we'll be seeing with one of the Weasley boys here soon).&nbsp; And even 
though people are separated into houses, it's apparent as well that everybody 
mixes these attributes in different ways (more below)</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial size=2>&gt; Behalf Of Gili 
Bar-Hillel<BR>&gt; Except Neville is in Gryffindor!! He is clearly the <BR>&gt; 
Hufflepuff type, just as <BR>&gt; Hermione is clearly the Ravenclaw type, but if 
there really were only <BR>&gt; Gryffindors in Gryffindor, what kind of group 
dynamic would there be?</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial size=2>I disagree.&nbsp; I 
don't think Neville is clearly the Hufflepuff type.&nbsp; What trait are you 
assigning to Hufflepuff?&nbsp; As I understand it, Hufflepuffs are those who 
work steadily towards worthwhile goals.&nbsp; They're loyal,&nbsp;determined and 
hard-working.&nbsp; This doesn't describe Neville at all.&nbsp; Others take 
Hufflepuffs to be simple-minded, but I think that's as misleading as assuming 
that Ravenclaws are smart (they aren't; they're studious, which isn't at all the 
same thing).&nbsp; So while Hermione reads a lot and likes to study, she is in 
Gryffindor because she isn't motivated by study, she is motivated by 
overthrowing bad-guys and achieving her full potential as a witch (hence 
Gryffindor).&nbsp; Harry is in Gryffindor because, while he has the ambition and 
hunger for power of a Slytherin, he actually chooses to emphasize personal honor 
instead.&nbsp; A true Slytherin would pursue his ambition even though he had a 
personal distaste for someone else in his house; Harry's dislike of Draco Malfoy 
played a large part in his desire not to be in Slytherin, despite the Sorting 
Hat's comment that he'd do well there.</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial 
size=2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial size=2>Okay, one final 
point and I'll shut up.&nbsp; I think a lot of people are going to be surprised 
once we get a little romance going (Real Soon Now (tm)).&nbsp; The universal 
assumption seems to be that Harry will end up with Hermione.&nbsp; I think this 
is clearly another example where Rowling makes things appear clear-cut while 
undermining that in important and interesting ways.&nbsp; It helps if you know 
that she is a huge fan of Jane Austen, though.&nbsp; In that light, it's pretty 
clear (at least to me, and I'll reiterate my right to be wrong) that Hermione 
isn't headed towards eventual love and life with Harry.&nbsp; She's headed for . 
.&nbsp;. wait for it . . . didja guess? . . . Ron.&nbsp; That's right, she's 
going to end up the future Mrs. Weasley and you can see that coming for a couple 
books now (if not right from the start).&nbsp; Book four is particularly clear 
if you're looking for it.&nbsp; In true romantic tradition, I expect they won't 
realize this for a while yet, but it is going to smack them upside the head in 
their not so distant future....</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial 
size=2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=671364100-01022003><FONT face=Arial size=2>Jacob 
Proffitt</FONT></SPAN></DIV></BODY></HTML>