<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=us-ascii">
<TITLE>Message</TITLE>

<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2479.6" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY>
<DIV><SPAN class=804504700-03092001><FONT face=Arial size=2>My post about the 
heroes of Neil Gaiman reminded me of a favorite of mine on the opposite end of 
the spectrum.&nbsp; Glen Cook's Garret novels are delightful.&nbsp; They started 
as a fantasy riff on Nero Wolff--a fantasy look at the detective genre.&nbsp; 
The thing I like most about Cook is that he thinks through the consequences of 
his alterations of reality and incorporates them in his books.&nbsp; Garret is 
the hard boiled ex-marine detective hero who does the leg work for his genius 
house mate and is really no intellectual slouch on his own.&nbsp; He's honest 
and funny and manages to figure it out in the end after taking his lumps.&nbsp; 
I particularly like how Cook managed to merge a modern image of a city with 
Ogres and pixies living side-by-side ("It's hard to push human racial 
superiority over the next guy when the next guy might be an Ogre with no sense 
of humor").&nbsp; The problem is that Glen Cook is far more popular with his 
Black Company series so Garret books are few and far between (like David Weber's 
fantasy series--only two so far).&nbsp; Anyway, since many on the list like 
Janet Ivanovich, I thought you might like Cook's Garret.&nbsp; It's a series 
where you absolutely <STRONG>must</STRONG> begin with the first book (_Bitter 
Gold Hearts_), though, and they don't do a very good job of keeping the prior 
books on the shelves (though you can usually find the latest one or two in 
bookstores).</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=804504700-03092001><FONT face=Arial 
size=2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=804504700-03092001><FONT face=Arial size=2>Jacob 
Proffitt</FONT></SPAN></DIV></BODY></HTML>