<!doctype html public "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN">
<html><head><style type="text/css"><!--
blockquote, dl, ul, ol, li { margin-top: 0 ; margin-bottom: 0 }
 --></style><title>stammering</title></head><body>
<div><br></div>
<blockquote type="cite" cite>On Wed, 4 Apr 2001, Sally Odgers
wrote:<br>
<br>
&gt; Is it true that people with stammers/stutters can *sing* without
being<br>
&gt; affected?<br>
<br>
Some people can. I used to have a friend in high school with a
really</blockquote>
<blockquote type="cite" cite>disabling stammer, who could sing with no
problems at all. In fact<br>
she was lead soprano in the school choir (which is how we became<br>
friends; I was the only alto who turned up at rehearsals for a<br>
while).<br>
</blockquote>
<blockquote type="cite" cite>&nbsp;&nbsp; Irina</blockquote>
<div><br></div>
<div>I have a speech impediment that can get pretty bad. I can sing no
problem though, and I can also act on stage without a hitch. It's when
I have to improvise I get into trouble, although speaking in the voice
of some exotic over-the-top character seems to make it go away. When I
have a really awful pun/shaggy dog joke it's at its worse. It has
something to do with anticipation for me: I'm looking for a reaction
and worried about it at the same time as I'm trying to trigger
it.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Sometimes when I'm really frustrated I give myself a tap on the
head to knock the words loose :-)</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Nat</div>
</body>
</html>