<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=2>
<BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">
<BR>&gt;&gt;Some of what I wrote comes from Bible studies, which are indeed part of 
<BR>the
<BR>&gt;&gt;regular school curriculum for all schoolchildren in Israel from second 
<BR>grade
<BR>&gt;&gt;on. My school was a secular school, so the focus in later years was more 
<BR>on
<BR>&gt;&gt;the Bible as literature, and less on religious aspects. Otherwise I doubt 
<BR>we 
<BR>&gt;&gt;would have been taught about the theory of the two creation myths, which
<BR>&gt;&gt;assumes that the book of Genesis was once two books, one written at a 
<BR>later
<BR>&gt;&gt;period in time, that were sort of edited together even later in history.
<BR>&gt;&gt;Religion would have it that the Genesis we read today was passed down
<BR>&gt;&gt;verbatim from God to Moses on mount Moriah.
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BR>(delurking) &nbsp;(good-humored-ly)
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">Yes, some of us crazed religious nuts actually believe this and teach it to 
<BR>our children. ;-) &nbsp;(I do, I send my kids to the religious part of the system 
<BR>here in Israel. &nbsp;All seven of them. &nbsp;Okay, a couple are too young for school 
<BR>yet.)
<BR>
<BR>I've looked at some of the Biblical criticism and textual analysis work, that 
<BR>figures there were more than one author based on the use of different names 
<BR>of G-d, literary styles, etc. &nbsp;I'm not saying I saw the best of it, but it's 
<BR>very unconvincing. &nbsp;Like, this whole section was written by Author A, because 
<BR>it uses El-ohim, and not Jeho-vah, but if you really look at that section, 
<BR>Jeho-vah IS mentioned a couple of times. &nbsp;
<BR>It ends up being like, okay, these two verses were by Author B, than these 
<BR>four by Author C (even though he, the little rascal, usually contains himself 
<BR>in Leviticus) and than Author A is part of verse five in this sequence.... 
<BR>etc. etc. 
<BR> 
<BR>Well, the Jewish commentaries have good explanations about why one name is 
<BR>used over another (or in combination) in different places. &nbsp;Each name 
<BR>emphasizes a different aspect of G-d. &nbsp;El-ohim is the aspect of strict 
<BR>justice. &nbsp;Jeho-vah is the aspect of mercy. &nbsp;The commentaries describe the 
<BR>meaning of why the name used is appropriate for its story.
<BR>
<BR>Repetitions of whole stories or parts of them are considered more proof of 
<BR>multiple authors, this is one version, this is another. &nbsp;Well, whatever else 
<BR>it is thought to be, the Torah is considered to be a high-quality literary 
<BR>work. &nbsp;I think that if this work WAS edited by a human editor, that person 
<BR>would have done a better job of tightening up the repetitions. &nbsp;And there 
<BR>wouldn't have been so many time jumps back and forth in the narrative. &nbsp;Etc. &nbsp;
<BR>Just MHO. &nbsp;So, unenlightened religious folk such as myself believe that there 
<BR>were pedagogical reasons for these unsophisticated textual ''errors". &nbsp;We are 
<BR>meant to learn moral/behavioral lessons from apparently superfluous words, or 
<BR>subtle changes in nuance in repetitions, or for why one story that took place 
<BR>later is still described earlier in the text.
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">&gt;<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I'm not sure if you mean all religions or only Judaism here, Gili. If the
<BR>&gt;latter, I can't comment, as I know very little about it; if the former, I
<BR>&gt;would like to stand up for liberal Christians and their attitude to the
<BR>&gt;Bible which is slightly more intelligent than this!</FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">
<BR>I know many scarily intelligent people who still believe in the authenticity 
<BR>of the Torah. &nbsp;One is the head of a physics departments in respected 
<BR>university. &nbsp;A guy I know, okay, no false modesty, he's my brother, started 
<BR>MIT at age 16, finished at 21 with a combined Master's degree in Chem E and 
<BR>American studies (a Mark Twain fanatic), and then did some serious Jewish 
<BR>learning. &nbsp;&nbsp;And I (shucks, blush) PASSED THE CPA EXAM ON THE FIRST TRY &nbsp;&nbsp;;-) &nbsp;
<BR>and also find the Divine origin of the Torah more convincing than the 
<BR>competitive theories. &nbsp;
<BR>
<BR>(And my brother and I were not brainwashed as kids, either, we came from a 
<BR>very intellectual-social Jewish kind of house. &nbsp;Partly traditional. Not 
<BR>religious.)
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">&gt;<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Incidentally, during the course of my theology degree we were taught that
<BR>&gt;Genesis was probably three books. Two of them were fairly contemporary with
<BR>&gt;each other, and the third, the "priestly" book, was probably added about 
<BR>the
<BR>&gt;same time that the Law was written. Not sure when that was but I also
<BR>&gt;remember being told that it was much later than suggested, and that when it
<BR>&gt;was claimed that the Torah had been found after many years it had actually
<BR>&gt;just been written. Mind you, my Old Testament lecturer was one of the
<BR>&gt;biggest cynics I've ever met...
<BR></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#8000ff" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">Anyone who is interested in this story of the 'found' Torah, let me know 
<BR>off-list. &nbsp;Don't want to get too too off topic. &nbsp;But there are some 
<BR>interesting points about this....
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>As for the angels discussion, I once knew another physics professor, a 
<BR>Tunisian Jew, &nbsp;who was also very learned in Kabbalah. &nbsp;He warned us against 
<BR>lightly saying the names of most angels. &nbsp;Or naming babies with their names. 
<BR>He said that when you say an angel's name, you call them. &nbsp;(Shades of 
<BR>Chrestomanci! Ha! Back on topic!) &nbsp;And if they come on a 'wasted' mission, 
<BR>they are angry and it's bad luck to have an angel displeased with you. &nbsp;(This 
<BR>is from memory of more than ten years ago, I hope I'm not mis-shading any of 
<BR>this.) &nbsp;He did say that the Archangels are too powerful to be pulled around 
<BR>at the beck and call of the likes of us, so their names are okay. &nbsp;I believe 
<BR>they are Gabriel, Michael, Rafael, and Uriel.
<BR>
<BR>One last point from the traditional Jewish perspective: &nbsp;&nbsp;Satan in Judaism is 
<BR>not an angel who rebelled and fell. &nbsp;Angels are considered messengers of the 
<BR>Almighty, who have no free will of their own. &nbsp;They are like intelligent 
<BR>robots who can only do the will of their Commander. &nbsp;Free will is the unique 
<BR>attribute of humans. &nbsp;So Satan, by his nature, COULD NOT rebel against G-d. &nbsp;
<BR>He does have some unpleasant (by human standards) jobs, but all of them he is 
<BR>Commanded to do. &nbsp;One is to be a Prosecutor aka Satan, to accuse humans of 
<BR>sinful behavior in the Court of Divine Judgement. &nbsp;(There are defense angels, 
<BR>as well.) &nbsp;Another job is to tempt people to sin (aka Evil Inclination). &nbsp;
<BR>Humans are rewarded for resisting. &nbsp;And finally, to take people's souls to 
<BR>the next world (aka Angel of Death).
<BR>
<BR>The shining Lucifer who fell actually reminds me of Prometheus (ha! back on 
<BR>topic again!), because he rebelled against heaven and came down to earth with 
<BR>fire. &nbsp;I like Prometheus better because as Diana showed him, he was a noble 
<BR>character. &nbsp;He knew the risks and took them to help people. 
<BR>The Lucifer who is supposed to be greatly talented and smart but is dumb 
<BR>enough to rebel against the Almighty doesn't compare to P.
<BR>
<BR>Arguments welcome. &nbsp;;-)
<BR>Esther
<BR> 
<BR>
<BR></FONT></HTML>