<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META content="MSHTML 5.00.2314.1000" name=GENERATOR>
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Philip wrote:<BR>&gt; Fair enough.&nbsp; But could 
you explain why the M disappears altogether in<BR>Welsh<BR>&gt; 
patronymics?<BR>Ok. Time to get technical again. I asked my friend Simon who 
recently got a<BR>PhD on early Welsh, and as I suspected, I did know, only it 
got buried under<BR>other piles of useless information. Here goes: Celtic 
languages share a<BR>feature known as mutations - for historical reasons (the 
principle of<BR>mumbling again!) beginnings of words change to indicate the 
word's function<BR>in a sentence, gender and other stuff. Mab "son" mutates to 
fab, pron. vab.<BR>One of the instances when this mutation may occur is in 
personal names, such<BR>as Dafydd fab Gwilym. The "fab" is unaccented here; the 
stress falls like<BR>this: DAfydd fab GWIlym. The Welsh has the tendency to 
"drop" (English drops<BR>hs!) its fs (vs phonetically), esp. in unstressed 
syllables, like in the<BR>above example. We are left with Dafydd ap Gwilym, who 
incidentally was "the<BR>Welsh Chaucer", a renowned poet. (1340 - 1400 
approx.)<BR>Ania</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>