<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META content="MSHTML 5.00.2614.3500" name=GENERATOR>
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Okay.&nbsp; Somebody asked me to clarify something 
I said about poets a while ago; I've been feeling guilty ever since for not 
answering quickly.&nbsp; My computer died (I rented a DVD, it died before I 
could watch it, I returned it, and it fixed itself.)&nbsp; and when I logged 
back on, I had one hundred seventy messages.&nbsp; I've just been through all of 
them and sent back numerous responses; I'm sure that you're all heartily sick of 
me by now.&nbsp; Just part of my plan. . . I've no idea what to say about the 
poets, especially because I can't remember what I said in the first place and in 
a typical act of brilliance, erased all messages.&nbsp; I'm so 
good.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Most of you will erase this; I don't blame 
you.&nbsp; I don't mind, only do yourself a favor and read Donne.&nbsp; He is 
incredible.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Okay.&nbsp; Marvell: I think I said that I didn't 
like him as much, esp. when compared to Donne.&nbsp; In "to his coy mistress," 
he writes Had we but world enough, and time. . . . an hundred years should go to 
praise/ thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze;/ two hundred to adore each breast/ 
but thirty thousand to the rest/an age at least to every part/and the last age 
should show your heart."&nbsp; We disliked him because he only got around to the 
heart after ages of concentrating on the body; he continues [if you don't sleep 
with me you'll die and] "then worms shall try/ that long preserved virginity,/ 
And your quaint honor turn to dust/ And into ashes all my lust."&nbsp; This was 
in contrast to Herrick, another carpe diem poet, most famous for that "gather ye 
rosebuds while ye may" poem.&nbsp; My favorite of his, though, was "Corrina's 
Going A-Maying."&nbsp; In this, the speaker talks to his mistress, not coy, not 
virginal, not even astoundingly young but in her prime; I could give you quotes 
for this but it'd take forever.&nbsp; The relationship in this poem also seems 
to be less about his lust and more about them both making the most of life 
together.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>On Donne: sex in his poem isn't so much about the 
chase, about conquering and laying waste to virginity and slaking lust.&nbsp; 
It's about a mutual enjoyment, love, even.&nbsp; In "The Sun Rising" he writes 
"Thy beams, so reverend and strong. . . I could eclipse and cloud them with a 
wink/ But that I would not lose her sight so long;/ If her eyes have not blinded 
thine. . . . She is all states, and all princes I/ Nothing else is./&nbsp; 
Princes do but play us; compared to this/ all honor's mimic, all wealth 
alchemy."&nbsp; Also, the tangible grief in the poems written around the time of 
his wife's death endear him to me:&nbsp; in A Valediciton; of Weeping, he writes 
"Let me pour forth/ My tears before thy face whilst I stay here,/ For thy face 
coins them, and thy stamp they bear."&nbsp; I want to copy out this whole poem, 
because it's so beautiful.&nbsp; The other one is A Nocturnal upon St. Lucy's 
Day, Being the Shortest Day.&nbsp; "Study me, then, you who shall lovers be/ At 
the next world, that is, at the next&nbsp;spring;/ For I am every dead thing/ IN 
whom love wrought new alchemy./ For his art did express/ a quintessence even 
from nothingness."&nbsp; I'll stop in the interests of keeping this email from 
going on forever.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>As for Milton, I have a confession.&nbsp; We read 
Milton at the very end of the class--during finals.&nbsp; I only skimmed, so I 
couldn't tell you about Milton, because I haven't actually read Paradise Lost 
since ninth grade and my memory's lousy.&nbsp; I can tell you anything you want 
to know about either Mary Baker Eddy and Mark Twain or the role of the Mother in 
Early American Women's&nbsp;Religons, esp. Shakerism.&nbsp; Yeah,&nbsp;liberal 
arts educations.&nbsp; An interesting tidbit: Milton was blind.&nbsp; He 
dictated everything to his three daughters.&nbsp; What changes or influences 
they made/were are unknown.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>If anyone's actually made it this far, well, I'm 
impressed.&nbsp; Thinking about it now, I've come to the conclusion that I 
didn't write this so that people could read it so much as I did so that I could 
stop feeling guilty.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Lizzie.</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>