<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN">
<HTML>
<HEAD>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=windows-1252">
<META NAME="Generator" CONTENT="MS Exchange Server version 5.5.2448.0">
<TITLE>RE: dwj-digest (Diana Wynne Jones) V1 #186</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY>
<BR>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>Gili wrote:</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>&quot;For the sake of those who actually tried to understand what I was going on about, (Elise - I thought the expression was &quot;holy cannoli&quot;!)....&quot;</FONT></P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>Language - so mutable&nbsp; ;)&nbsp; Cannolis are actually a source of awe and reverence for me - especially if there are no pieces of candied fruit in them.&nbsp; But somehow it was just time for a &quot;camoly&quot; instead of a cannoli.</FONT></P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>I loved that old Batman show where Robin was always saying &quot;Holy bat signal, Batman!&quot; or &quot;Holy perfidious pulchritude, Batman! The Cat Woman must be behind this!&quot;&nbsp; Plus, the way the fight scenes would have that music and the &quot;Pow!&quot; and &quot;Wham!&quot; special effects.</FONT></P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>Or in Superman, how Clark's editor was always saying &quot;Great Caesar's Ghost!&quot;</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>inane rambling now petering out...</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>E</FONT>
</P>
<BR>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>&nbsp;I'll try to </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>clarify, and apologize for being unclear yesterday but I was being rushed:</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>For most purposes, Israel uses Arab numerals same as most of the rest of the </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>world (except Arab countries, that have their own Arab numerals just to be </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>confusing). The exceptions in Israel are certain traditional or religious </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>contexts such as numbers of chapters and verses in religious texts, and </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>Hebrew dates, which are still counted in letters.</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>Every letter in the Hebrew alphabet has an assigned number value. The </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>difference between counting with Arab numerals and counting with Hebrew </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>letters, is that with Arab numerals order is significant: the rightmost </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>digit sigifies units of one, and each shift left signifies to increase the </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>value of the digit by a power of ten. (the decimal point allows us to </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>continue decreasing by powers of ten, and count numbers smaller than one). </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>When counting in Hebrew letters, the order is not significant (though the </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>convention to start with larger values on the right, in the direction you </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>would read them in Hebrew). You add up the value of all the letters, without </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>multiplying any of them by a power of ten. As the largest number that can be </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>represented by a single letter in Hebrew is 400 (taf), this makes it an </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>inconvenient system for larger numbers.</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>Hence, the current Hebrew year, nicknamed &quot;tashas&quot; or &quot;hatashas&quot;: </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>5,000+taf+shin+samech=5,000+400+300+90=5,790</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>The 5,000 is represented as a heh, which should actually be just five, but I </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>guess it's an easy shortcut for the digit that changes least often. (expect </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>a Hebrew millenium bug in 201 years).</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>Yet another counting variation you all know is what we do with Roman </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>numerals: each letter has an assigned value, but the significance of order </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>is to determine whether you are to subtract or add the smaller value from </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>the larger. Hence VI=6, but IV=4.</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>The only advantage I can think of for the Hebrew counting system is for </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>mystical numerology type uses. Since order is not significant, any </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>permutation of the same letters has the same numerical value, and more than </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>one set of letters can yield the same sum. Mystics use this to calculate the </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>numerical value of words and try to equate them with other words to prove </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>some mystic connection between them - this is called Gemmatria. I can't </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>think of great examples right now.</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>But here's a tidbit: the number 15, which could be represented by 10+5, is </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>conventionally represented by 9+6, because the letters for 10 and 5 in </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>succession form an abbreviation of the name of God, and one does not take </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>the name of God in vain.</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>That's probably more than you ever needed to know about counting in Hebrew. </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>But then again, we are fascinated by this kind of detail when it is invented </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>by an author to embellish an invented culture. And we are often not aware of </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>the cultural alternatives that already exist in our own world.</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>________________________________________________________________________</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at <A HREF="http://www.hotmail.com" TARGET="_blank">http://www.hotmail.com</A></FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>--</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>To unsubscribe, email dwj-request@suberic.net with the body &quot;unsubscribe&quot;.</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>Visit the archives at <A HREF="http://suberic.net/dwj/list/" TARGET="_blank">http://suberic.net/dwj/list/</A></FONT>
</P>

</BODY>
</HTML>