[DWJ] Hexwood

Meredith MacArdle meredithxyz at googlemail.com
Wed Oct 17 06:24:36 EDT 2012


Well we would probably all enjoy such a course, so dream on ...

cheers, Meredith

On 17 October 2012 08:26, Kyra Jucovy <arykiy at gmail.com> wrote:

> I have to admit, I remember thinking about *Hexwood *constantly back when I
> was taking my seminar on colonial and postcolonial literature, we were
> studying *Absalom, Absalom!*, and my professor kept talking about the
> structure of modernist narrative.  I have to admit that I don't remember
> all the details as well as I'd like because, much to my shock, this is
> somehow eleven years ago now (it took me longer to believe that then I'd
> like to admit), but the idea of the narrative that goes in line with the
> human structure of memory and stuff like that really seemed to fit in very
> well with *Hexwood*.
>
> So. . . yeah.
>
> I guess the dream DWJ course I'd teach if I could ever magically become a
> professor without writing a dissertation would include *Fire and Hemlock*
> and
> "Four Quartets," *The Homeward Bounders* and *Prometheus Unbound*,
> *Archer's
> Goon* and *1984*, and *Hexwood *and *Absalom, Absalom!*?
>
> Actually. . . now I've made myself a little sad.  That would be so much fun
> to teach!  But then of course there probably isn't anyone in the world who
> would actually want to take such a course, so I guess it all works out.
>
> ---Kyra
>
> On Wed, Oct 17, 2012 at 4:52 AM, Martha Hixon <marthahixon at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> > Hi, Jackie,
> >
> > well, yes, what WERE you thinking? :-) *Hexwood* is a difficult novel in
> > that the timeline isn't linear, but it's not hard to read, really (that's
> > the beauty of it), especially for a grad class of English majors. I
> haven't
> > taught the book, but I do talk about how it exemplifies narrative theory
> in
> > my article in *Telling Children Stories*, an anthology edited by Mike
> > Cadden published by Nebraska UP. *Hexwood *would also prompt good
> > discussions regarding identity, both self identity and how others see us,
> > and personal redemption. You could also talk about it in the context of
> > modern fantasy that draws from Arthurian legend, of course. When I teach
> > Jones, I usually use *Howl's Moving Castle* because of its inventive use
> of
> > fairytale paradigms, or *Fire and Hemlock *as an example of retelling
> > folktales, but to be honest, I did consider it for my grad class last
> > spring, though I went with* F&H* because it seemed simpler, ha (because
> I'd
> > taught it before).
> >
> > I'm interested in how it goes with your class. Keep us posted!
> >
> > Martha
> >
> >
> > Dr. Martha P. Hixon
> > Department of English
> > Middle Tennessee State University
> > Murfreesboro, TN 37132
> > 615-898-2599 / martha.hixon at mtsu.edu
> >
> >
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