[DWJ] Listers to the Rescue... Again

Farah Mendlesohn farah.sf at gmail.com
Thu Aug 16 11:59:43 EDT 2007


Try:

Miss Pettigrew Lives for A Day by Winifred Watson. I kept catching
bits of it on the World Service and was finally frustrated enough to
go and buy it. A delightful book about a woman who is a complete
misfit as a governess and accidentally stumbles into a job as
companion to a young and foolish actress (c. 1930). Very romantic in
all sorts of non-slushy ways.




On 16/08/07, Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net> wrote:
> > What books are *particularly* wonderful to read aloud to adults?
>
> It may sound obvious, but _The Hobbit_.
>
> Also, anything else that might remind people of their youth or young
> adulthood is often enjoyable for the older homebound population,
> according to studies. In  America, that includes things like Little
> House on the Prairie books. I don't know what the British/Aussie
> equivalents are.
>
> Patricia McKillip's earlier stuff comes out quite well when read aloud.
> Also, Terry Pratchett, especially Wee Free Men.
>
> You might consider asking the people being read aloud to what kind of
> books they prefer and go from there. Telling people what you are likely
> to read to yourself may give them ideas-- adults are unlikely to ask to
> be read children's books of their youth, but if you say you read a lot
> of children's books, they may ask for those under the guise of humoring
> you. (I'd suggest, for instance, the Borrowers.)
>
> --
> -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net
> "I thought you might need rescuing . . . We have a bunch of professors
> wandering around who need students." -- Dan Guernsey
>
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-- 
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research
would it?" (Albert Einstein)



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