[DWJ] Fire and Hemlock

Dorian E. Gray israfel at eircom.net
Mon Dec 4 15:41:03 EST 2006


I've just been re-reading "Fire and Hemlock" yet again, and I've had another 
new idea about the ending.
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spoiler space, just in case
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When it comes to the pool, Laurel tells both men that each of them may use 
anything that is truly his.  Can it be that the only thing a person has that 
is truly theirs is their self?  But Morton does not truly own himself; 
Laurel owns him.  So he has nothing to use in this contest, and can only 
hope that Tom buggers up - because, like all of Laurel's contracts, this has 
a twist, and that twist is that any attempt to use anything that isn't truly 
yours will damn you.  This would explain why Tom's attempts to use music, or 
the horse, tip him further in, and it's only Polly's renouncing him that 
makes him realise that all he has is himself, and lets him win.

What does anyone else think?

Until the sky falls on our heads...

Dorian.
--
Dorian E. Gray
israfel at eircom.net
www.livejournal.com/users/dorianegray

"I will not trust you, I,
Nor longer stay in your curst company.
Your hands than mine are quicker for a fray;
My legs are longer though to run away."
-Wm. Shakespeare, "A Midsummer Night's Dream" 




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