[DWJ] Feeling sorry for Penelope (was Fire and Hemlock Question)

Rene Fleischbein rene_fleischbein at hotmail.com
Fri Aug 18 19:43:35 EDT 2006


About Cinderella:

>she becomes the centre of someone else's universe


But isn't it wrong to teach this to little girls?  These girls grow up 
looking for this prince who just doesn't exist for most people (royals don't 
count in this discussion but even they are not all that pleasant according 
to some).  Then these women become bitter about the promise they were told 
as a little girl because children believe fairy tales.  Then you end up with 
a woman like Ivy (F&H) who bought into all the cultural myths about being 
female.

Yes, I know it's a character in a book who says this but I also think this 
concept is universally conveyed in this way.

Best,
Rene


From:
>There's a lovely discussion of Cinderella in Jenny Pausacker's Young Adult
>novel *Dancing on Knives* (which I think Hallie has read - but it's only
>out in Australia chiz chiz), where one of the characters* says:

>'Cinderella' isn't a rags-to-riches story. It's not about waiting for your
>prince or marrying into money. First and foremost, it's about a child who
>suddenly finds she's not the centre of her parents' universe any longer.
>She doesn't whine about it, though. She just gets on with her life and in
>the end, she becomes the centre of someone else's universe. So the
>message, if you want a message, is that it wasn't the child's fault, she
>doesn't deserve it, and things will get better.





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