word order (was Re: Random DWJ discovery of the day)

Colin Fine colin at kindness.demon.co.uk
Thu Mar 31 16:29:54 EST 2005


Anna Zofia Skarzynska wrote:

>----- Original Message -----
>From: <liril at gmx.net>
>To: <dwj at suberic.net>
>Sent: Thursday, March 31, 2005 2:22 PM
>Subject: RE: word order (was Re: Random DWJ discovery of the day)
>
>
>  
>
>>I figured out most of the examples, so not all is lost (on me - and not:
>>    
>>
>all
>  
>
>>is not lost ;-)
>>
>>And it is true that not all constellations are possible in German, some
>>    
>>
>are
>  
>
>>only be possible in poetic language and would be expressed with different
>>words in everyday language.
>>
>>Different meanings can be conveyed by stressing the words in German, too
>>    
>>
>and
>  
>
>>probably in most languages.
>>The sentence "Ich traue keinem Mann mehr" can mean: "I don't trust any man
>>anymore" and "There is no man I trust more".
>>
>>
>>Bettina
>>
>>(It's just me who just wants a just verdict?!)
>>    
>>
>
>Reminds me of an Irish poem (of the Early Modern love poetry genre)
>(diacritics omitted, sorry, can't seem to make them work in Internet
>Explorer)
>
>Si mo ghra
>An bhean is mo bhios dom chra
>
>She [is] my love
>The woman who torments me the most...
>
>Except that the second line could be read 'the largest woman who torments
>me' , 'is mo' meaning both 'the biggest/largest' and 'the most'.
>
>  
>
Isn't it often the case that poems are ambigouous at one level or 
another? Some languages
have more ways of making ambiguity than others, but I would venture that 
every natural
language can do it.

Colin

--
To unsubscribe, email dwj-request at suberic.net with the body "unsubscribe".
Visit the archives at http://suberic.net/dwj/list/



More information about the Dwj mailing list