Help with Howl: Rugby, Welshisms and saucepans

Anna Zofia Skarzynska ania at gnomic.freeserve.co.uk
Thu Mar 17 06:59:51 EST 2005


That would be an English/anglicized alternative version. It would never be
spelt, or more to the point pronounced with two final Ls in Welsh. LL is
always pronounced as, well, LL- a peculiar Welsh sound which for centuries
had been variously rendered by the non-Welsh as thl, fl, cl and probably
more. Shakespearian Fluellen is Llywelyn; I have seen Dolgellau (little town
in Meirionydd/Merionethshire) spelt Dolgethly; Floyd is, I believe, a
variant of Lloyd, or Llwyd 'grey'.
(Remember the language Katherine Kerr created for the Deverry novels- she
used cl where you'd have ll in real Welsh- there was a clan called Clw Coc
'red lion', which is taken from the Welsh Llew Coch).


Ania


----- Original Message -----
From: <minnow at belfry.org.uk>
To: <dwj at suberic.net>
Sent: Thursday, March 17, 2005 12:11 AM
Subject: Re: Help with Howl: Rugby, Welshisms and saucepans


> >> > Is Howell a particularly Welsh name?
> >>
> >> Yes. Even more so when spelt Hywell.
> >>
> >> Robert
> >
> >Hywel, not Hywell. The difference is important, because LL is pronounced
> >very differently from L on its own.
> >Hywel Dda ('H. the Good') was a 10th c. Welsh king (famous for
introducing a
> >set of laws to Wales), so the name is of some antiquity.
> >
> >Ania
>
> I regret to have to tell you that *The Wordsworth Dictionary of First
> Names* (1995) gives "Hywell" as a "variant form".
>
> Other books have offered Hywl, Hywel, Howel, Hoel.  According to the
> various books, it means "eminent", "lordly" or "conspicuous"!
>
> Minnow
>
>
> --
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>
>


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