Christianity in the Chrestoverse

Dorian E. Gray israfel at eircom.net
Wed Jul 20 16:34:03 EDT 2005


Jadwiga said...

>> Which would make for some pretty different history...it's said that the
>> split happened when our world turned more toward technology and XII A
>> turned more toward magic...I wonder if part of what caused the split was
>> the emergence of the Inquisition in our world?  I can't see the 
>> Inquisition
>> happening in a magic-oriented world (or not the way it did in our world, 
>> at
>> least), which would change things like colonisation and the way the New
>> World was dealt with at least somewhat.
>
> Ok, I'm missing something. What about a magic-heavy world would
> discourage persecution of differing brands of heresy, not to mention
> converted Jews and Muslims who weren't really converted to Christianity?

You're right.  I didn't think it far enough through before I posted.  I 
*was* thinking mainly of the witch-persecutions, and had forgotten the 
persecutions of Jews and Muslims.  My bad.
>
> Given the arm-waving among scientists (and among practitioners of
> ceremonial magic) for that matter about theory, I would assume that a
> Church office to standardize and control dogma would be encouraged by
> the spread of magic.

Good, and very interesting, point.  The office of Chrestomanci ought to have 
(or have had) a certain involvement here.

> Most of the witchfinding and witch persecution our universe in Germany,
> England, Scotland and France seems  to have been more or less, ahem,
> autonomous, and there were sporadic attempts by the Churches at least in
> Germany to get rid of false witchfinders who were 'finding' witches
> based on getting a slice of their property.

Very true.  Look at what happened to Matthew Hopkins in England, too!

> certainly there were
> people even in our universe who believed that they were cursing other
> people, and if they turned out to be real witches, there would be a very
> strong and present need to do something about it. Thus instituting the
> office of the Chrestomanci would probably replace certain functions we
> historically think of as associated with religious authorities.

Again, this means Chrestomanci ought to be (or have been) working very 
closely with the religious authorities.

> Well, the Roman inquisition got it's big push from the existence of
> Protestantism, and the idea that some cultures could have refrained from
> splitting up the religion into different denominations by a change in
> the 14th century seems unlikely. The rise of magic might well have
> fuelled Protestantism, and religous wars fought with the help of magic
> are a terrifying prospect.

I don't know enough about the rise of Protestantism to discuss this, 
unfortunately.  I may well have been talking through my hat originally.

But I'm with you on religious wars with magic - one of my current favourite 
series is Eric Flint's 163-whatever, in which a small modern American town 
suddenly finds itself transplanted to the middle of Germany in 1632; i.e., 
the middle of the Thirty Years War.  Looking at the descriptions of the 
battles and the politics, the thought of adding magic is indeed, as you say, 
terrifying!

Dorian. 

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