word order (was Re: Random DWJ discovery of the day)

Otter Perry ottertee at silverwinggraphics.com
Thu Apr 7 10:33:26 EDT 2005


On Tuesday, April 5, 2005, at 05:05 PM, Colin Fine wrote:

> One of his arguments for this is the number of cases where we get it  
> 'wrong'. I'm not talking about the many people who ignore the rule in  
> normal speech and say "It's me", but about the people who  
> 'hypercorrect' and say "between you and I", for example. According to  
> the prescriptive rule this is wrong because 'between' should be  
> followed by an accusative. Emonds would argue that what has happened  
> is that people have been taught that their inner rule is wrong ("I  
> mustn't say 'John and me went'"), have not internalised the intended  
> rule, (because it depends on a category which does not exist in their  
> language), and have deduced another rule ("when talking about me and  
> someone else, always say 'I', not 'me').

My partner hypercorrects on this one and it drives me _nuts_.

This is an interesting point.  Because if I wanted to correct her  
[which I
refrain from doing unless she actually asks me to proofread something],
I would certainly tell her the rule about accusatives.  I don't  
actually have
working knowledge of anything but English, but in my time, I have  
studied
Russian, Latin, and Greek.

I would mention that my knowledge of certain obsolete forms, like 'thee'
and 'thou' and so on, is very accurate, having been raised an  
Episcopalian
on the King James Bible and the [USA] 1928 Book of Common Prayer --
which has plenty of Cranmer and Coverdale in it.


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would be one that never killed those who suffered from it, that could
not be treated effectively, and that doctors and their patients would
nevertheless insist on treating anyway. Luckily for it, the American
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