dwj-digest (Diana Wynne Jones) V1 #748

Charles Butler hannibal at thegates.fsbusiness.co.uk
Thu Nov 13 17:32:04 EST 2003


Sarah:
>Groening rhymes with complaining.

That does surprise me. I'd always assumed that the 'e' indicated a missing
umlaut, and puckered up to pronounce the vowel the German way. I see now
that I puckered in vain (not for the first time). But Matt Graining?
That sounds like a DIY product ("Matt Graining - to bring out the natural
beauty of your wood..."). Oh well. Livvenlern.

Charlie

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Sarah" <sarah-neko at dove.gen.nz>
To: <dwj at suberic.net>
Cc: <dwj-digest at suberic.net>
Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2003 12:42 AM
Subject: Re: dwj-digest (Diana Wynne Jones) V1 #748


> I've heard this story said of St Augustine. Any other
> takers anyone?
>
> Jon

Aargh.

> Gaiman is pronounced "Gay-m'n" according to Neil's own Web site. That
> should alleviate the confusion :-)
>
> widdy

Yeah, but now it just makes fourteen-year-old boys snigger!
Well, nearly anything can make fourteen-year-old boys snigger.

> Kyla: Actually, according to the man himself, his last name is
> pronounced
> Gaym'n, not Guy-man. [1] I knew I read that somewhere, and so I've been
> pronouncing his name correctly for several years now, but all my
> friends
> always ignore me and keep on saying Guy-man. Which looks weird, to
> boot.

Guy-Man! The MOST manly superhero! He's not overcompensating for
ANYTHING!
*^.^*

> *delurks*
>
> I've heard it of Julius Caesar - I don't know how true
> it is. But Roman literature was written to be read out
> loud to an audience as much as to oneself, and it's
> thought that when people read to themselves, it was
> with lips moving.
>
> Chris

Perhaps it just goes in and out of fashion. It's impossible to check,
anyway! Was there ever a big paradigm shift from reading with lips
a-flap to true silent reading, or have people always done either
depending on inclination?
This reminds me of something I often wonder: before music could be
recorded and played back many times sounding exactly the same, did
people get that thing where a song goes round and round in your head?
Again, how can we check? Comb through old diaries? Hope Pepys mentions
it? *^.^*

> Not that I know of.  There are no other Dorian E. Grays out there that
> I've
> seen, though as Dorian Gray without the E., there are many sites
> dedicated
> to both my literary namesake and some heavy metal band.  And there are
> no
> other Grainne Duncans out there either.

Perhaps this is a rude question - I really don't mean to be offensive,
but did your parents give you the name of a fictional character *on
purpose* for some reason?

> Does one really get a "u" noise from the vowels "ai"?  Is this some
> thing
> like pronouncing the surname "Sidebottom", "siddy-both-arm"?
>
> I can't think of any English word in which "ai" is pronounced "u".
> Examples, please, help.

It's not an English word, but what about the Welsh nickname Dai for
David?
I would say it was the -y sound we were getting, not the -u sound.

> Gaiman rhymes with Lehmann, anyhow.  Just to confuse people.
>
> Minnow

Groening rhymes with complaining.

>> I can't think of any English word in which "ai" is pronounced "u".
>> Examples, please, help.
>
> Not English, but the Welsh name Dai rhymes with Guy - however, I agree
> it
> seems a strange mistake to make.
>
> Charlie

Charlie and I have great minds and think alike.
This pronunciation of 'ai' always strikes me as logical because I've
studied Italian, am interested in Japanese and know how to pronounce
Maori, even if I don't understand it; in all these languages, 'ai' is
pronounced as in Dai. I never trust English words to tell me how they
are pronounced with their spelling, especially not names. Thus I've
never felt confident that I was pronouncing Mr Gaiman's name correctly
either way.
For that matter, Dai is Japanese for great or big, so Welshmen named
David get to have an ego trip when in Japan.

> Huh.  I was slightly bummed that Delight was slightly ... Delirious.  I
> wanted her to be more happy, less pre-flaky.  I loved cranky Death,
> though.  She's had such a wonderful attitude adjustment.
>
> - -deborah

Perhaps he just enjoys writing her as flaky too much to change it. She
also gets to be very cute in Jill Thompson's shoujo manga-style
companion volume to 'Season of Mists,' 'At Death's Door'... although if
this story has a failing, it's that Del's cuteness is played up to the
point where her insanity just seems, well, cute and goofy, rather than
genuine and sometimes tormenting.

@}->-->---
E you later,
Déesse
(the artist formerly known as Sarah-neko)

http://www.airandangels.com/
Air and Angels Anime Shrines


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