Question: "High" concepts in Fantasy

Dorian E. Gray israfel at eircom.net
Mon Mar 3 15:44:53 EST 2003


Jon said...
>
> I think that names have a special place in Fantasy and
> perhaps do deserve a rating of their own. They
> certainly should be a function of language, but in
> poorly written fantasy (and even some good stuff) this
> is not always the case. Sometimes a common every day
> name can appear quite discordantly in a fantasy novel
> ("Colin the barbarian") or names can get
> unpronouncably silly (grignr, cthulhu).

Blink?  "Cthulhu" isn't unpronounceable!  *I* can pronounce it, and so can
most of my friends (though very few of them can spell it correctly).  So
there! :-)

> Then we have
> those names that rather give the game away "Prince
> Dutiful Farseer" or "Lord Foul" - I mean if your
> parents named you that you'd probably turn to evil too
> - just imagine what he went through at school)

I went through a brief phase at age 16 of wanting to be called Dracula.
Luckily I got over it pretty fast.

Until the sky falls on our heads...

Dorian.
--
Dorian E. Gray
israfel at eircom.net

"I beseech you, in the bowels of Christ, think it possible you may be
mistaken."
- O. Cromwell


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