Cart and Cwidder missing text LONG

jackie e stallcup jstallcup at juno.com
Tue Jun 11 17:26:31 EDT 2002


Wow--thank you for all that work!  I'm going to take this home and
compare...

Jackie S.

On Tue, 11 Jun 2002 10:09:26 +0100 (BST) Rowena Macrae-Gibson
<rowena.macrae-gibson at brunel.ac.uk> writes:
> Ok I've gone through my 2 copies of this, and the cuts all seem to be 
> at 
> the beginning of chapter 2, that's pages 17-19 of my Puffin copy, 
> and pages 
> 14-15 of the Mandarin 1993 reissue. It may be that there are other 
> edits 
> along the way, I only went through the parts that mentioned history, 
> the 
> Adon, Hannart & Keril.
> 
> Manadarin:
> And almost every earl in the land had some kind of claim to be king. 
> Even 
> before the last king ruled from Hannart in the North, there had been 
> 
> quarrels and wars, and the country showed signs of breaking into 
> two. And 
> when the Adon, who was the last king, died, his heirs were not to be 
> found. 
> Civil war began in earnest.
> 
> Puffin:
> And almost every earl in the land had some kind of claim to be king. 
> Even 
> before the last king took the kingstone and ruled from Hannart in 
> the 
> North, there had been quarrels and wars, and the country showed 
> signs of 
> breaking up into its separate earldoms. And when the Adon, who was 
> the last 
> king, died, his heirs were not to be found and neither was the 
> kingstone. Civil war began in earnest.
> 
> Manadarin:
> Since then the only rulers of Dalemark had been the earls, each in 
> his own 
> earldom, with the lords under them. No one now wanted a king.
> 
> Puffin:  (spot the difference!)
> Since then the only rulers of Dalemark had been the earls, each in 
> his own 
> earldom, with the lords under them. At first, the earls of the South 
> had 
> grouped together simply to stop the earls of Hannart from becoming 
> kings. 
> And when the ordinary people in the South showed signs of wanting a 
> king 
> from Hannart, those who dared say so were hanged. The earls of the 
> North, 
> who were a more independent lot, became indignant at this and slowly 
> 
> grouped in support of Hannart. Times changed. No one now wanted a 
> king.
> 
> Mandarin:
> You did not say anything that suggested you were discontented with 
> the ways 
> of the South. The countryside was known to be full of spies and 
> informers, watching and listening to give warning of rebellious 
> thoughts.
> 
> 
> Puffin: (This is the main edit) 
> You did not say anything that suggested you were discontented with 
> the ways 
> of the South. 
> 
> That had been the latest in a whole series of uprisings. The first 
> few had 
> been in North and South alike, and those had all been led by those 
> claiming 
> to be the lost kings. The earls of the North had taken them lightly. 
> Since 
> the mountains in the North always made rebels and criminals hard to 
> catch, 
> the laws of Hannart and of Gardale had long forbidden things like 
> taking 
> the families of rebles as hostages or laying waste their homes. So 
> the 
> earls fought the rebels, parleyed with them and sometimes joined 
> them. 
> Whatever their reasons, Clennen was fond of saying, 'The earls of 
> the North 
> treated their enemies like men'.
> 
> It was different in the lowlands of the South. There were no hiding 
> places 
> and no customs of mercy. The earls stamped out the false kings hard 
> and 
> bloodily, and went on to slaughter the families of their followers. 
> Then 
> they go together to impose new laws and terrible penalties for 
> anyone who 
> rebelled again. And what happened was that rebellion died out in the 
> North, 
> but discontenet and uprsisings went on and on in the South. The laws 
> became 
> ever more severe. And this had its effect on the earls there. They 
> became 
> accustomed to having the power of life and death over their subjects 
> and 
> were scornful of the weak ways of the North. Yet they were also 
> extremely 
> frightened of what the ordinary people might do to them, should an 
> uprising 
> be successful. So they made more and more fiercer laws.
> 
> The result was that many people fled from the South to the North. 
> There 
> they plotted further rebellion - or were feared by the earls of the 
> South 
> to be doing so. The earls demanded that the North either send these 
> people 
> back, or put them to death. The earls of the North came together and 
> 
> replied, in a letter, which Clennan had made all his children learn 
> by 
> heart. It was, as he said, a famous piece of history. 'What goes on 
> in a 
> man's head', the earls of the North said, 'is his own business. We 
> do not 
> hang him because he thinks he has a grievance. Nor, according to the 
> laws 
> of Hannart, do we hand him over for another man to hang.' That had 
> been 
> over fifity years ago, but, as Clennan said, it was still the same 
> today. 
> And it showed the importance of Hannart. For, no matter what the 
> disagreement, whether over kings or common men, Hannart had always 
> been at 
> the heart of it. Keril, the present Earl of Hannart, had helped to 
> organize 
> the last uprising and spoken out against the South ever since. The 
> earls of 
> the South hated and feared all the North, but Hannart most of all. 
> The 
> countryside was known to be full of spies and informers, watching 
> and 
> listening to give warning of rebellious thoughts.
> 
> So who edited Cart & Cwidder? was this suggested by the publisher, 
> or did 
> DWJ want to make the 4 Dalemark books 'fit together' more? 
> I still think it's a great shame. I mean I can put up with the 
> various US 
> expressions that appear in some of her books, eg pretzel packets 
> instead of 
> peanut packets in Hexwood, or the odd sidewalk instead of pavement 
> elsewhere, but these cuts change the flow of DWJ's writing as well 
> as 
> taking away plotpoints for the novel.
> 
> Thoughts, anyone?
> 
> Rowena Macrae-Gibson
> Subject Liaison Librarian 
> Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences
> Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middlesex. UB8 3PH
> tel: 01895 274000 ext2788
> fax: 01895 203264
> email: Rowena.Macrae-Gibson at Brunel.ac.uk
> 
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