The ideal music to read a DWJ novel to.

Dorian E. Gray israfel at eircom.net
Wed Sep 5 15:44:38 EDT 2001


Philip said...
>
> I'm finding this very difficult.  I seem to use quite different
parts of my mind
> for reading and music-listening.  Perhaps that's because I'm more on
the
> absolute music side than the programme music side.  That said, most
of my
> thoughts below seem to be programmatic...
>
> And half the stuff Dorian mentions I haven't even heard of :-(

I have extremely eclectic tastes. :-)
>
> > With "Fire and Hemlock" should go a mixture of Steeleye Span
(British
> > folk-rock; IIRC they did version of both "Tam Lin" and "Thomas the
> > Rhymer") and 80s pop.
>
> Gosh, no!  String quartets and cello music, almost exclusively :-)
Try Dvorak's
> cello concerto for starters.

Oh, how could I have forgotten about the celli?!  I am such a fool.
Of course there should be some of that too.  I agree about the Dvorak,
and I'll add Brahms' Cello Sonatas (two of my all-time favourite
pieces of music!).
>
> (I have toyed with the idea of writing a cello concerto based on the
book.  But
> it probably won't happen...)

That would be so cool!  Have we any cellists here who could play it?
I quit learning when I was 16 or 17.

> > "Dogsbody" wants something Goth-ish but dreamy - maybe some of The
> > Mission's slower stuff.
>
> I can't make a mental connection between Dogsbody and any sort of
music.
> Strange.

I have no idea why I made that connection.  But I did.  And maybe a
little prog rock would go in there too.
>
> > "The Ogre Downstairs" has to be 70s rock...Whitesnake and Deep
Purple,
> > interspersed with the Bay City Rollers (!).
>
> :-)  We are never told what sort of music Indigo Rubber play, are
we?  But it's
> a great name for a group!  (Should we start one?  There must be
enough of us who
> can play/sing...)

I sing a passable alto, and, while not actually playing anything
properly, can get a decent noise out of almost every instrument (flute
excepted).  Hallie and Becca both sing too, I think - I know Becca's a
soprano, and she plays the piano too.  And you play brass, don't you,
Philip?  There's a fair-ish start!

> > The other Chrestomanci books need something soberer.  Some of
Bach's
> > organ stuff, perhaps.  Except "Witch Week", where I find myself
> > thinking The Damned.
>
> But something eastern for the temple of Asheth, I think...

Yes, you're right.  Something Egyptian-ish, I think, in a minor key.
>
> Right.  Some more.
>
> Sudden Wild Magic.  What would people suggest for the jingly sort of
music
> played in Arth and the Pentarchy?

Something with lots of tambourines and xylophones? :-)  Maybe a
New-Age-y something.

> Yes, although the Anne McCaffery I'd have picked is the second Pern
trilogy -
> Dragonsong, Dragonsinger, Dragondrums...

Oh yes.  My brain must have been dead last night; I should have
thought of those!
>
> I like music treated sensibly in fantasy and SF - see the Tough
Guide entries on
> Song etc. for how not to treat it - and this usually means writers
who are also
> musicians.
>
> Anne McCaffery is I think quite an accomplished singer.

She trained as an opera singer, I believe, and sang professionally in
a touring opera company for a while.

> Charles de Lint puts the music to his protagonist's songs in an
> appendix at the back of "The Little Country", which is a nice touch.
(And I
> have still only learned to play one of them!)

I'd forgotten about him, too - I think he jams with a folk group quite
often too.
>
> Who else writes books and is a musician?

Mercedes Lackey sings and plays the guitar.  She has quite a nice alto
voice.

I've a notion Emma Bull is a singer, too, and Steven Brust.
>
> Also with a musical theme, try "Space Opera" by Jack Vance.  The
"Spellsinger"
> series by Alan Dean Foster tries hard, but doesn't quite make it in
my opinion,
> but if you try it you may disagree.

Oh, and I should have mentioned Guy Gavriel Kay's "Fionavar Tapestry";
one of the Brahms cello sonatas features strongly in the first book,
"The Summer Tree" (and, in fact, is what inspired me to get hold of a
recording thereof; I wanted to find out what it sounded like!).  It's
been a while since I've read it, but I think music features in his
"Tigana", too, and "A Song for Arbonne" is full of troubadours and the
like.

Until the sky falls on our heads...

Dorian.
--
Dorian E. Gray
israfel at eircom.net

"I feel that if a character cannot communicate, the very least he can
do is to shut up!"
--Tom Lehrer

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