Worms from Lind

Britta Koch bkoch at rz.uni-osnabrueck.de
Thu May 18 15:22:33 EDT 2000


On 18 May, Philip.Belben at powertech.co.uk wrote:
> 
> 
> Welcome back, list!  Well done Deborah! (And let that teach you not to upgrade a
> system that already works ;-) )
> 
> A few weeks ago, I was on holiday in Munich, where the existence of a road
> called "Lindwurmstrasse" reminded me of this question.  Since the question
> originated in Hexwood, it is on topic, and the list should have enough
> literature students - and Germans - to give me some sort of answer...

There's also a soap called "Lindenstrasse" that is set in Munich - I
wonder if there's any connection ;)

> So my question is, what is the origin of "der Lindwurm"?

My boyfriend looked it up in a (I think fictional) fantasy
"dictionary", where it said that the Lindwurm (draconis nematoda) _had_
wings but no feet - like a worm. He also said he thought it might come
from the Nibelung saga, where Siegfried is made invincible by bathing
in a dragon's bllod, but forgets about a leaf between his shoulders (a
leaf from a "Lindenbaum", ash tree? elm tree? don't know what Linde is
in English, sorry ;)

I could only think of Astrid Lindgren's "Brothers Lionheart", where
maybe Katla is referred to as a "Lindwurm", but I may be wrong and only
connect the malicious dragon image I get when I hear "Lindwurm" with
Katla.

As for another occurrence of worms from Lind - could that be Terry
Pratchett?

I think the "Lindwurm" is in a category with the Leviathan...

My 0.02 Euro ;)

Britta
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