Off-Topic

Mary Ann Dimand amaebi at iwon.com
Thu Jul 20 14:27:03 EDT 2000


Sally said:

>    I'm inclined to say - "Wot? Again?"

That's sort of my reaction.

>    There are at least two points I think could be easily
> refuted...

>    "His will, dictated to a lawyer, makes no mention of a
> literary legacy and who should inherit it."

>    I think this one vastly overestimates the value put on
> plays at that time and in that place. They were useful
> commercial works, not high-flown literary hymns. Shakespeare's
> plays were the soapies or cop dramas of their period - they
> appealed to "common man"...

Also what would an heir inherit? There was no copyright. And royalties on
works published by another party had not been invented.

>    However, I suppose this will never really be settled. And I
> suppose further than many people don;t really *want* it
> settled. They prefer it open to theory.

Again, I agree with the sapient Sally. And of course "proof" is not a
well-defined term. It's what convinces one-- and that differs with one's
priors. tastes, philosophy, and probably what one had for breakfast.

>    P.S. There was some odd story a while ago that the Bronté
> ladies wrote nothing much - their brother it was that did it!

That's certainly what Mr. Meyerburg (Mybug) in Cold Comfort Farm contended.
Of course, he was a parodic figure of fun. :D

Hey, Sally, have you ever read Joanna Russ's How to Suppress Women's
Writing? I think you'd enjoy the chapter on claims that women's work was
written by men, particularly.

Mary Ann
bacon, anyone?


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