Rumor: DWJ on film?--That's not the strange part... (fwd)

cme at MIT.EDU cme at MIT.EDU
Sun Feb 20 21:38:43 EST 2000


Here's the most contentful article I found on the subject on
rec.arts.books.childrens...

Courtney

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From: Derek Janssen <djanss at ultranet.com>
Newsgroups: rec.arts.books.childrens
Subject: Rumor: DWJ on film?--That's not the strange part...
Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2000 11:31:12 -0500
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...How about (and note, unconfirmed at present) Japanese anime-tor Hayao
Miyazaki, of "Kiki's Delivery Service" and "Princess Mononoke" fame,
reportedly "considering" Diana Wynne-Jones's "Howl's Moving Castle" for
a future project?--

Again, no source was mentioned on the news item, and there's good cases
to be made for and against believing it:

On one hand:
* Tokyo tabloids have been known to be notoriously loopy about their
cinema's top-selling favorite son (and you should've heard some of their
improvisatory handsprings when they found out "Mononoke" was coming to
America--Madonna singing the theme song, anyone?), and the real Miyazaki
had already preliminarily announced his retirement after his current project--

While on the other:
* Although Miyazaki has been sticking to themes of "lost" Japanese
culture for his last few projects (eg. "Mononoke"), he prides himself on
being "unpredictable" from one project to the next--
And although not having much love for English, his trademark is for
stories that take place in specifically non-identifiable European-style
locations, and had loosely adapted another little-known Western book
(Alexander Key's "The Incredible Tide") earlier in his career...

So, watch this space--
Either way, it's a good reason for me to reread the book again...

Derek Janssen (who's still trying to track down the BBC "Archer's Goon")
djanss at ultranet.com
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