yotg discussion (spoilers)

McMullin, Elise emcmullin at kl.com
Tue Dec 19 19:52:10 EST 2000


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> >enough spoiler space?
> 
On Wed, 13 Dec 2000, Melissa Proffitt wrote:
> 
> remember.  Anyway, again, great book, but I wanted a different
perspective.
> This time it was immediately obvious:  in the section where Corkoran is
> reading their first essays, and we get a summary of each one, the
> tantalizing hints about how magic works or could be made to work just
> grabbed me.  I seriously wanted to read those essays.  Failing that, I

Kyla wrote:
	"On that note, I thought it was incredibly interesting how all six
of them wrote what sounded like really neat essays, all inspired by the
same questiony books, but still completely different and unique. And even
their handwriting seemed in character."

--I'm still yearning to have a conversation about the nature of magic.
Isn't that what you both are saying too?  I mean, if we can't see their
essays -- what would *your* essay be like and how would it express your line
of thought as a sort of natural expression of your particular signature
magic?  I'm pretty sure my magic would have a lot to do with metaphor,
symbol and association.  It would also be very plain - no lightning - might
not look at all like magic on the surface - sort of like those undergrad
essays I was describing earlier, it might be... errr diplomatic.  Ooh please
someone pick up the ball and run with it....


> Speaking of my namesake, that was another gem hidden away in the book--the
> part where Melissa starts going on about why she's at the university, and
> you realize, She isn't a caricature.  DWJ doesn't disdain her.  She has
some
> real depths to be explored.
I also thought that was really neat. Sure, she's afraid of mice, and
shrieks and gloms onto the nearest male, but she's still a *person*, who's
trying to *do* something. 

Er, hmm. I always thought that whole idea of shrieking and leaping on
furniture was slander. Until I met a mouse this past summer.  I shrieked and
leaped backward on to the back of a chair.  Another day, another
high-falutin' notion from which I am disabused.

"...[re: Deep Secret]and it was quite amusing how each of the main
characters initially thought
the other one was insufferable. It neatly did away with the biased
perspective problem."

My favorite is when Rupert goes to the health food shop and Mari's mother
calls him a prat.  Makes me cackle. My second favorite is when he realized
he had such high expectations when he was trailing Mari around the town and
that he had constructed a whole, dare I say, Titus and Isodel scenario in
his mind.  Isn't that just like life sometimes?


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