yotg discussion (spoilers)

M Elizabeth Parks meparks at mtholyoke.edu
Tue Dec 19 13:37:48 EST 2000


Philip wrote: In short, I don't see why I should take it as read that the
ambient magic
enables all talking creatures to speak the same language.  There are
better
ways
of presenting the language problem and its solutions, and DWJ herself has
used
them in other books.  In this case, I would even accept it if there was
evidence
that Chesney had enforced unity of language, but there isn't.  And anyway,
I
don't think his influence spread to the other continent...

Philip.  (Who is still disagreeing with things, for reasons he can't
fathom)

me: I would just like to point out that griffins have mouths shaped
completely differently from ours.  I've heard that some species couldn't
speak our language if they wanted to.  Having griffins be able to
pronounce our words might require some sort of magic.  Having griffins at
all requires some sort of magic, I should think.  Just look at Elda on the
cover of YotG (I know she's one of Dirk's magical creations, but still the
others must be similar).  Halfway through she changes from feathers to
fur, which i don't think could happen completely naturally (of course, the
other griffins might be different) (and cover art doesn't really count as
canon) (and it's just occured to me that parrots have beaks and they can
say human phrases).

Switching topics: one of my favorite parts of the book is when you realize
that half of Lukin's notes have disappeared from the notebook  of
truth.  ah, academia.  <stares ruefully at the pile of class notes in
front of her>  I really wish I had one of those.

Philip:
PS I've been wondering the last couple of days what it must be like to be
one
of
Derk's pigeons...

me: lol.

I've sort of been picturing them as the goodfeathers from the cartoon
"animaniacs"--what it sounds like, a parody of goodfellas with
pigeons.  Picture a pigeon with a de Niro dub. . . ;^)

lizzie

*******************************************************************************
The simple act of telling a woman's story from a woman's point of view is
a revolutionary act: it never has been done before.

				--Carol P. Christ


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