yotg discussion (spoilers)

Melissa Proffitt Melissa at Proffitt.com
Wed Dec 13 02:11:06 EST 2000


On Tue, 12 Dec 2000 08:58:25 -0500 (EST), Kyla Tornheim wrote:

>Haha! As I am the one who asked about this, I'll start the discussion. And
>I'll put in lots of spoiler space, so don't worry.
>
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>enough spoiler space?

It was for *me*.  :)

I'd again like to thank whoever it was that put me on track to realize why I
don't love these books like I feel I should.  It was probably Kyla.  I don't
remember.  Anyway, again, great book, but I wanted a different perspective.
This time it was immediately obvious:  in the section where Corkoran is
reading their first essays, and we get a summary of each one, the
tantalizing hints about how magic works or could be made to work just
grabbed me.  I seriously wanted to read those essays.  Failing that, I
wanted to read a book in which the world's magic system was the most
important thing.  It's embarrassing to have this feeling about a great
author.  It's like quietly saying "hey, it was good, but why didn't you
write a completely different book?"

But the characters were wonderful, and the description of the university
life, and how everyone interacted.  AND MELISSA WAS NOT A COMPLETE MORON.
So there.  And someday I want to look at how _Dark Lord_ and _YotG_ parallel
each other, or if it's just the coincidence of the endings (Scales/Policant
appearing to reveal lost knowledge and get things back on track).

Speaking of my namesake, that was another gem hidden away in the book--the
part where Melissa starts going on about why she's at the university, and
you realize, She isn't a caricature.  DWJ doesn't disdain her.  She has some
real depths to be explored.  I think what gives DWJ's books solidity is the
existence of other stories within the main story.  Tolkien did this with a
world; DWJ does it with people.  I just know that if DWJ had chosen to tell
the events of _YotG_ from someone else's point of view--even Melissa's--it
would have been every bit as complete a novel as it is now, though a very
different one.  All DWJ's books are like this to some degree.  How about a
short story of _Homeward Bounders_ from Konstam's point of view?  _Dark
Lord_ told from the POV of the pilgrims in Blade's party (the book it seems
I really wanted to read)?  Sometimes she actually does it:  _Deep Secret_
springs to mind as an excellent example of at least two books overlapping in
a single volume.

Can't wait to re-read _YotG_.  It was really good--every bit worth waiting
for.

Melissa Proffitt
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