poll which is far too full of washing

Mallory Loehr mloehr at randomhouse.com
Thu Sep 9 10:01:23 EDT 1999



I think Winnie the Pooh did. Lloyd Alexander did it in his MARVELOUS
MSADVENTURES OF SEBASTIAN, although that's obviously not archaic. Did
Howard Pyle maybe use this? Was there some old King Arthur collection that
used it?

I have to admit I really like it, it captures an old, fairytale feeling
that is especially perfect for HOWL. But I'm a sucker for that stuff.




Paul Andinach <pandinac at tartarus.uwa.edu.au> on 09/09/99 09:31:55 AM

Please respond to dwj at suberic.net

To:   dwj at suberic.net
cc:    (bcc: Mallory Loehr/Merch/RandomHouse)
Subject:  Re: poll which is far too full of washing




On Thu, 9 Sep 1999, deborah wrote:

> I'd like to ask folks' opinions about the style of the Howl's Moving
> Castle table of contents:
>
>   Chapter 1: In which Sophie talks to hats
>   etc...

Makes more sense as "Chapter 1, in which Sophie talks to hats", etc.

Just a thought.

> Did the "In which" style conjure up any specific images for you?
> Any particular books?  Particular genre or age?  Was it completely
> unfamiliar?  How did you react to it?

Slightly archaic, was the impression I got. It did seem familiar, as
if it used to be a common conceit that fell out of use.

Didn't the Winnie-the-Pooh stories have titles like that?

Paul
--
"...the greater part of my wardrobe is black... it's a sensible
 colour. It goes with anything. Well, anything black."
  - Neil Gaiman

--
To unsubscribe, email dwj-request at suberic.net with the body "unsubscribe".
Visit the archives at http://suberic.net/dwj/list/



--
To unsubscribe, email dwj-request at suberic.net with the body "unsubscribe".
Visit the archives at http://suberic.net/dwj/list/



More information about the Dwj mailing list