introduction for the third time, if this doesn't work I give up!

Tanaquil2 at aol.com Tanaquil2 at aol.com
Thu Dec 16 11:09:33 EST 1999


In a message dated 12/16/99 2:03:07 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
Melissa at Proffitt.com writes:

>Well, I'm glad to see that SOMEONE is paying attention.  I hate having to
>repeat myself.  :)

        LOL

>But then, I used to drive my mother insane with my daytime
>reading habits....Minutes later--another yell, this one more specific,
>frequently with comments on whether or not I was actively *trying* to push
>her buttons.

        LOL!

>Her revenge is that I now have a daughter who does it to me.  When she
>finally learns to read I plan to install an intercom system to her bedroom.
>With a screamer circuit.

        <thoughtfully> I wonder where we can get one of those?


In a message dated 12/16/99 2:59:39 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
amgraham at cygnus.uwa.edu.au writes:

>The Family Tree (not in the least bit heavy handed, a little shiver of fear
>but not a lot, and delightful)

        Oh, yay!  I just got a used copy of this the other day and I haven't 
read it yet


In a message dated 12/16/99 6:56:21 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
abhillel at hotmail.com writes:

>Best hiding place I've ever found a cat in (after over 10 hours searching 
>when we first brought her home): on a bookshelf, in the gap between the 
>backs of the books and the wall. And there were DWJ books on the shelf so 
>this is, in fact, on topic.

        LOL      <admiringly> nice link to topic too!

>For those of you who *don't* know who Enid Blyton is, here is a typical 
>story I remember: There was a little girl who was a compulsive scribbler, 
>and used to scribble on walls and papers. And one day she was attacked by 
>tiny invisible hands pinching and slapping her. Turns out she was writing 
>some very rude things in fairy language and upsetting the fairies. As soon 
>as a precious brownie explained this to her, she apologised and never 
>scribbled again and they all lived happily ever after.

        Yikes!

I just missed the younger ones, but I remember reading the school and mystery 
ones a lot. (aged 7 - 11) interspersed with numerous reads of the Narnia 
chronicles and "Black Beauty."  EB was unofficially 'banned' in our 
school---they said because of her writing style, but on glancing at a used 
copy in a bookstore a year ago, I think it may have had more to do with the 
shocking stereotyping: Carlotta the fiery spanish girl etc etc.  The banning 
pretty much guaranteed that everyone ran off and read them.
If you can beg, borrow, or otherwise hunt down the video for the Comic Strip 
Presents (Adrian Edmondson, Jennifer Saunders, Dawn French et al) mini-movie 
called "Five Go Mad in Dorset" you will get a good idea of her mysteries!  
It's funny even if you haven't read them: like the way they always introduce 
themselves as "Hello, we're the Famous Five!", and demanding (paraphrase 
because of sketchy memory) "bags of crisps, heaps of tomatoes, and lashings 
of ginger beer!"  It makes you realize that in fact they would have been v 
annoying to meet in real life!  I think there was a sequel called "Five Go 
Mad on Mescaline" but I missed that one :(
And (re: Kylie's post again) EB books had matching spines (color coded by 
series I think) so they were easy to arrange on the shelves, furnishing hours 
of decorating pleasure.
Apparently she hated children.  John Lennon did a funny parody too, "The 
Famous Five Through Woenow Abbey."


In a message dated 12/16/99 8:06:14 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
pandinac at tartarus.uwa.edu.au writes:

>"Although sometimes I think the True Game books have dropped off the
> face of the earth, or there's some conspiracy to stop Tepper readers
> learning about them...
> ...oh, excuse me. One of my pet gripes appears to have slipped its
> leash. :)

        <laughing in sympathy>

> I can remember how it ended, but I've forgotten the question.

        was the answer 42???


In a message dated 12/16/99 8:37:56 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
Philip.Belben at pgen.com writes:

>I don't think I can manage forthwith.  Next week is likely to be the earliest
>... um ... how about, I promise to write it next time I read the book, which
>will probably be early next year.  I can then read it with some of the other
>listmembers' comments in mind, and produce a more complete treatment of the
>topic

        coolcoolcool!


In a message dated 12/16/99 9:01:19 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
sodgers at hotnet.net.au writes:

>missing books consist of books that had better stay
>missing! Seriously, sometimes there's a good reason when books die out

        Yes, it's called mercy killing I believe!


>Aberdeen wondered what it would take, exactly, to dispose of Jasper
>Diamond. Ground glass? A silver bullet? Or maybe a big wax doll and a
>fist-full of pins? (MIX AND MATCH)

        You have the most enticing quotes!  Who IS this Jasper Diamond????


In a message dated 12/16/99 10:02:04 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
emcmullin at kl.com writes:
>>>Elise:
>>> Don't forget - Keeper of the Hidden Theorem, also known as the Proof
>>>of Doom.  The great math-phobic masses remain blissfully unaware of the
>>>depraved, writhing, non-Euclidian chthonic chaos which would inundate
>>>the
>>>world like seething viscous acid but for the adamant will of one lone
>>>figure, steadfastly holding back unimaginably nightmarish forces and
>>>allowing us to tuck up safe and placid in our beds at night.
>>>
>>Max replied:
>>
>>  "Oh, that's YOU! Thanks!"
>>
>   No - that's jenwa! See what a thankless task saving the world is?
>:D

    
    Jenwa said: alternate occupation: (The Angle of) Death (and marathon 
scritcher)
    Elise replied: Don't forget - Keeper of the Hidden Theorem, also known as 
the Proof of Doom.  The great math-phobic masses remain blissfully unaware of 
the depraved, writhing, non-Euclidian chthonic chaos which would inundate the 
world like seething viscous acid but for the adamant will of one lone figure, 
steadfastly holding back unimaginably nightmarish forces and allowing us to 
tuck up safe and placid in our beds at night.
    Gili replied: "Oh, that's YOU!  Thanks!"        
    Max replied: ROTFL
    Elise replied: No - that's jenwa! See what a thankless task saving the 
world is? :D
    Max replied: ROTFL


In a message dated 12/16/99 10:22:23 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
emcmullin at kl.com writes:

>I can't even describe my job interview experiences - 98% weird and
>odd.  In one they let me speak to my prospective coworkers.  As soon as the
>door closed, all of them said at once "Don't work here! It's awful! Run!
>Flee!!"

        ROTFL

>In another the interviewer talked all about herself.  I assumed
>human resources people sometimes have to keep interviewing to justify their
>own jobs even if they don't have any reason to hire someone.  In another
>they told me they only wanted to hire people who could live with their
>parents (because they didn't intend to pay a living wage) - that was
>publishing.

        Stop!  It hurts!  ROTFL!

Max
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